Winklevoss twins accuse Shrem of stealing Bitcoin worth $32m

Winklevoss twin says Bitcoin valuation will top $40k, plays down Silk Road closure

Winklevoss twin says Bitcoin valuation will top $40k, plays down Silk Road closure submitted by CrunchyBones to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Winklevoss twin says Bitcoin valuation will top $40k, plays down Silk Road closure

Winklevoss twin says Bitcoin valuation will top $40k, plays down Silk Road closure submitted by rockDcock to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Who is the richest Bitcoin owner?

Technically, Bitcoin was worth less than 10 cents per bitcoin upon its inception in 2009. The cryptocurrency has risen steadily since then and is now worth around $6000 per Bitcoin. This is the most remarkable appreciation of the value and has created many millionaires over the last eight years.
Here are the top ten people/institutions that held a large amount of Bitcoins over time:
1. Satoshi Nakamoto
The creator of Bitcoin, who hides behind the moniker Satoshi Nakamoto, remains the major holder of bitcoins. The number of bitcoins that Nakamoto owns today is estimated at around 1.1 million, based on the early mining that he did. This is the equivalent of about $6 billion at today’s exchange rate of 1BTC to 6,098 USD. At least Nakamoto has never touched most of his bitcoins, and neither converted them into real-world currencies nor used them for any other purpose. If he were to sell his entire stash, the value of Bitcoin could plummet in an instant.
2. Bulgaria
Bulgaria is currently sitting on one of the biggest stashes of Bitcoin in the world. How did the European nation come into the possession of this enormous sum of money? A crackdown on organized crime by the Bulgarian law enforcement in May 2017 resulted in the seizure of a stash of 213,519 Bitcoins, enough to pay off a quarter of the country’s national debt.
According to Bulgarian authorities, the criminals used their technical prowess to circumvent taxes. As of June 2018, the virtual coins would be worth more than $1.2 billion. The Bulgarian government has declined to comment on the status of the coins.
3. BitFinex
BitFinex, a crypto exchange, has one of the largest bitcoin wallets with 163,133.38 BTC that are worth approximately $1 billion at the current price of $6,098.24 per bitcoin. The coins are believed to be kept in a cold wallet to protect them from cyber hacks, unauthorized access and other vulnerabilities that a system connected to the internet is prone to.
4. The FBI
The FBI is one of the largest renowned holders of Bitcoin. In September 2013, they brought down Silk Road, the infamous dark web drug bazaar, and seized 144,000 Bitcoin owned by the site’s operator Ross Ulbricht, better known as, “Dread Pirate Roberts”. Ulbricht made critical blunders that allowed investigators to locate the site and link him to it. Users of Silk Road are said to have traded around 9.5 million bitcoins since Ulbricht launched the site in 2011. Even thought the FBI sold a large amount of their Bitcoin holdings or even all, the FBI worth mentioned as they had a fortune in Bitcoin at some point. A large portion of the Bitcoins seized and sold went to Barry Silbert.
5. The Winklevoss Twins
Tyler Winklevoss and Cameron Winklevoss were among the first Bitcoin billionaires. The duo had first gained popularity when they sued the Facebook C.E.O. Mark Zuckerberg for allegedly stealing the idea of creating Facebook from them. They were contacted by Zuckerberg to develop the ConnectU site, which was to become Facebook later on.
They used $11 million of the $65 million cash compensation they received from the legal dispute with Zuckerberg to purchase 1.5 million Bitcoins in 2013. Back then, one Bitcoin traded at $120. That investment has increased more than 20000% since then.
The twins allegedly own around 1 percent of all Bitcoin in circulation. Their combined net worth is approximately 400 million. They created the Windex, funded several bitcoin-related ventures and invested $1.5 million in BitInstant.
6. Garvin Andresen
Although bitcoin is the brainchild of Satoshi Nakamoto, Garvin Andresen is credited as the person who made it what it is today. Garvin is one of the people who has been suspected to be Satoshi, a claim he denies. Rather, he says that he had a close relationship with the anonymous cryptographer for many years. The real Satoshi Nakamoto picked him as his successor in late 2010. Garvin became the chief developer of the open source code that determines how Bitcoin operates – and whether it can survive. He was once paid over $200,000 in Bitcoin by the Bitcoin Foundation for his contributions. He had already cashed out multiple times.
7. Roger Ver
Roger Ver, otherwise known as Bitcoin Jesus, is one of the first Bitcoin billionaires and believed to hold or held at least 100,000 bitcoins. The renowned libertarian allegedly dropped out of college to focus on his bitcoin-related projects. Unlike other crypto billionaires out there who are throwing their cash in the typical private Islands or luxury jets, Ver’s dream is to establish his own libertarian nation where every individual is the absolute owner of their own life and are free to do whatever they wish with their person or property. The controversial bitcoin evangelist renounced his U.S. citizenship in 2014 and relocated permanently to a small Caribbean Island.
8. Barry Silbert
Silbert is a venture capitalist and founder of Digital Currency Group. He was an early adopter of Bitcoin. He purportedly walked away with an eye-watering 48,000 Bitcoins in an auction held by the U.S. Marshals Service in 2014. The US government had confiscated much of the crypto coins from Ross Ulbricht, the alleged operator of the dark web marketplace for drugs and other illegal products. Bitcoin was then worth $350, which means Silbert’s coins have skyrocketed in value from $16.8 million to $288 million.
9. Charlie Shrem
Charlie Shrem is no doubt one of the most controversial Bitcoin millionaires. He invested in a large quantity of Bitcoin in the early days of the cryptocurrency. Shrem was also an active member of the Bitcoin Foundation and founded BitInstant when he was just 22 years old. By the end of December 2014, Shrem had been found guilty of money laundering and received a two-year prison sentence. After his release from federal custody, he unveiled a startup called Intellisys Capital, a company that sells investment portfolios in blockchain companies.
10. Tony Gallippi
A famous business magnate Tony Gallippi is also believed to be one of the big holders of bitcoins. He is the brain behind BitPay, one of the most popular Bitcoin payment service providers in the world. The company was launched in May 2011 and processes over one million dollars per day. Bitpay is also one of the companies to sign contracts with major companies including Microsoft, Dell, TigerDirect, and Newegg. By 2014, the company had employed approximately 100 people.
Conclusion
It is estimated that the top 1000 bitcoin addresses own approximately 35% of the total bitcoin in circulation. There are also thousands of individuals who hold large stashes of bitcoin but have chosen to remain anonymous.
submitted by alifkhalil469 to BtcNewz [link] [comments]

Bitcoin 2015 so far

I don't know about you guys, but I've noticed that shit in bitcoin-land seems to be moving faster and faster... I browse this sub and a few other communities daily, and I've been making a short note whenever something significant happens. Lots of good, even more bad, probably a lot of stuff that I missed, and plenty of sweet drama :) Here's what I've got for January 2015
(these are not in exact order)
Again, probably lots that I missed, but all in all it's been a pretty balls-to-the-wall last 4 weeks. I don't have time to find references for all of these, but if another redditor wants to do it that would be cool. Here's to another month of madness
tl;dr running out of popcorn, need to buy more.
edit adding in some other items people mentioned below
submitted by cryptonaut420 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency Investors

Hello! My name is Mihail Kudryashev, I am a frontend engineer at Platinum. We are a an international STO/IEO/ICO/POST ICO consulting, promotion and fundraising company with huge experience in STO and ICO marketing and best STO blockchain platform in the world! Learn more about it: Platinum.fund Our company gained popularity after launching the world’s number one online university with only practical knowledge on crypto economics. Now you can learn how to create and develop your own ICO and STO, how to market your campaign and make it super successful. Who are cryptocurrency investors? What drives people to invest in cryptocurrency? Read the extract of the UBAI lesson to get all the answers.
Introduction to the Investors §2
In 2017, the total cryptocurrency market capitalization was approaching $850B which begs the question:
Why are investors turning to cryptocurrencies?
A survey by Blockchain Capital indicated that at least 30% of millennials would rather invest in bitcoin than invest in traditional stocks. Cryptocurrency investors, like traditional investors, expect a return at least proportionate to the risk they take. Due to the fundamental lack of regulation, incredible volatility and astronomical relative risk, many cryptocurrency investors expect to earn meteoric returns. Returns in the ranges of multiples from 200% to 1000%.
Let us first begin by examining the kinds of people who invest in cryptocurrency, and then let’s see the reasons why each of them is investing in this relatively new market.
Types of Investors
The “Newbie” Cryptocurrency Investor
This investor is just starting out. They probably have not had any significant experience in any form of investing before and bitcoin is their first experience. They have heard about people making incredible returns from cryptocurrency investing, or some aspect of the entire blockchain and crypto revolution attracts them, and they decide they want to invest too.
Unfortunately, most of the newbie investors will end up losing their money, primarily because of one specific misconception; they think cryptocurrency investing is an easy way to make huge profits. “ “Types of Investors §2
“Gambler” or “Get Rich Quick” Investor
This is the second class of cryptocurrency investor, and is actually not really an investor at all.
This type of person is out to make a fortune as fast as possible. They will fall for whatever sweet-sounding scheme they hear. They love ideas that promise to double or triple their investment quickly. Like the Newbie, they do not understand how cryptocurrencies work, and they don’t care. The difference between this kind of investor and the successful individual or professional investor is that the gambler does not care about the management of risk, or about the timing of trades.
They place their money on the table, and they hope it will make a good return. They are gambling rather than creating an investment thesis and executing a well-thought out strategy. They might even have an infectious positive attitude, but unfortunately it is not backed by knowledge or the due diligence required to be a successful investor.
A good example of this style of thinking, outside of cryptocurrency, is high yield investment plans (HYIPs) that promise to multiply an investors capital by a certain factor. This is not to say that all HYIP programs are scams, but a good number of them are. Most importantly, the investors who flock into such plans have similar characteristics to that of the Get Rich Quick investor in that they will not take the time to learn about the field in which they are investing. They are just looking for fast money and an overnight success. “ “Types of Investors §3
Short Term Traders (Day/Swing Traders)
Short term traders must, without a doubt, be the most knowledgeable investors if they are going to succeed at their chosen profession. They have, or they should have, studied the art and science of trading more thoroughly than other people. This is the kind of investor who has taken the time to learn about cryptocurrencies and the markets on which they trade. Short term traders create deliberate and timed strategies in an attempt to profit from fast market movements. Maybe many of the short term traders started off as Newbies, but these are the individuals who took the time and effort to learn about the market. They wanted to know what they were doing. These are the people who survived and thrived to grow into the type of trader that they want to be.
Interestingly, the Day Trader does not attach emotion to any given coin. They do not need to believe in the sustainability/whitepapevision/road map, etc. of the project they are buying into at any particular time. They just need to be confident about the direction and timing of the potential price movement of the coin. “ “Types of Investors §4
Long Term Investors/ Hodlers
A great majority of successful cryptocurrency investors can be most properly classified as Long Term Investors, or HODLers in true crypto terminology. These are investors who understand quite a bit about cryptocurrency and blockchain technology and believe in the sustainability of the coins in which they are investing.
Think of the first few investors who bought bitcoin in the early days and years, when it was still deep under the radar for most people. These are the people who believed in the blockchain and cryptocurrency revolution. They didn’t sell their bitcoin for fast profit, although they had many chances to do so. They knew what they were doing, holding for the long term. These early investors and HODLers enjoyed astronomical growth all the way up to 2016 and 2017. But to be a long-term holder despite all the bad news and negative factors surrounding this brand new asset class, they must have really believed that bitcoin and the blockchain were going to change the world. This belief can only be established through study and research about the blockchain industry and the specific currencies and tokens in which you are going to invest.
Follow up and learn more on www.ubai.co!” “Types of Investors §5
Sophisticated/Professional Investors
These are experts in cryptocurrency investing. They most likely have a background in other forms of trading and investing, such as in stocks, bonds or options etc. They may also be earning fees by investing or managing money for other people.
The Iconomi fund managers are a good example. Each Fund Manager manages an array of digital assets. Investors might choose Iconomi because it offers a platform for the investor to allocate funds to specific fund managers, with the ability to swap between managers instantly if the investor desires to do so.
Each fund manager selects a number of coins in which they wish to trade or invest, with specified time horizons, short or long term. Investors can buy into the array of mutually held coins. This allows investors to utilize the knowledge and experience of professional fund managers to trade an allocated pool of capital, hopefully generating returns greater than the individual investor would be able to produce on his own.
The fund managers are motivated by the fees and commissions they earn, and perhaps a performance-linked bonus. You can certainly be properly classified as a Sophisticated Investor without any need to be a fund manager for other peoples’ money. But a professional fund manager has the ability to trade with a larger pool of capital, manage complicated risk, and diversify trading strategy to generate various streams of income. “ “Between Countries
A particular country’s participation in cryptocurrencies largely has to do with the legal regulations about blockchain projects and crypto currency investment in that jurisdiction.
When China banned the use of cryptocurrency, most Chinese nationals had to withdraw their investments. Many other countries have also placed bans on the use or trade of cryptocurrencies. Countries like Japan that have allowed the use of cryptocurrencies have witnessed a significant rise in cryptocurrency investments as a result. Japan and South Korea are home to several high-traffic cryptocurrency exchanges, meaning that a notable proportion of their population is investing in cryptocurrencies.
Another way to look at cryptocurrency investment demographics is to look at the bitcoin ATMs present in each country. The United States of America is the leading country, followed by Canada and then the United Kingdom.
According to a report by Google trends, the five top countries interested in bitcoin are: South Africa, Slovenia, Nigeria, Colombia and Bolivia.
Remember, cryptocurrency demographics can be a little tricky due to the anonymity involved. Many people may be afraid to participate in surveys, especially when their governments have placed legal restrictions on cryptocurrency investing.
The main point the research seems to validate is that the demographics of the cryptocurrency investor base is diverse. While the average investor may be a white or Asian male between the ages of 26-30 with at least a university degree, the entire investor base is so much larger than that. Many big investors are likely to be significantly older, and have connections and businesses in the traditional economy as well. “ “Notable Investors in Cryptocurrency
While many people have made fortunes from cryptocurrency investing, a handful of them stand out as being particularly remarkable. We will take a more detailed look at some of the biggest investment success stories to see how they did it and learn about their investing strategy.
The Winklevoss Twins
After being awarded their settlement from the lawsuit against Facebook, the Winklevoss twins decided to invest a significant portion of their money in Bitcoin. They invested $11million of the $65million they received. At that time, the price of a single bitcoin was about $120.
This high-risk investment paid off handsomely and they became the first publicly known Bitcoin Billionaires, perhaps owning more than 1% of the total bitcoin in circulation. In an interview with Financial Times in 2016, the twins jointly said that they consider “Bitcoin as potentially the greatest social network because it is designed to transfer value over the internet”. They also pointed out that compared to gold, bitcoin has equal or greater foundational traits of scarcity and portability. “ “Notable Investors in Cryptocurrency §2
Michael Novogratz
A self-made billionaire ex-Goldman Sachs investment banker, Novogratz has invested more than 30% of his fortune in cryptocurrency. In 2015, he announced a $500million cryptocurrency hedge fund, including $150million of his own money. Novogratz believes that “the blockchain, the computer code that underpins all cryptocurrencies, will reshape finance, just as the internet reshaped communication”.
The investment thesis of Mr. Novogratz is similar to that of the Winklevoss twins. He has taken and maintains a long-term position while he trades in and out of short term moves, based on his fundamental belief in the potential and likely application of the underlying blockchain technology. By starting an investment fund in addition to his other cryptocurrency related ventures, he is demonstrating a strong fundamental grasp of the technology, including its applicability and impact across so many industries. Slide
Barry Silbert
In December 2014 after the US Marshal’s office seized 50,000 bitcoins from the Silk Road, Barry Silbert purchased just 2,000 of those bitcoins at $350 per coin. A few years later of course, those coins were worth millions of dollars.
Barry is the founder and CEO of the Digital Currency Group (DCG) a cryptocurrency investment firm. Barry also made significant profits from Ethereum Classic, purchasing the coin in its very first days. He has invested in over 75 bitcoin related companies, including CoinDesk. As founder of the Digital Currency Group, Barry endeavors to support bitcoin and blockchain companies and accelerate the development of the global financial system. “ “Directly through Exchanges
Step One: Register on a reputable cryptocurrency exchange
To start investing, you first need to register on a reputable cryptocurrency exchange where you can buy bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Binance is a good exchange to use in this lesson. While it may or may not be the best, it is currently the largest, and they provide a very supportive layout and customer service department.
You should remember, to buy most altcoins (cryptocurrencies other than bitcoin), you specifically need to use an exchange like Coinbase or Kraken that allows you to convert fiat currency into cryptocurrency. From there, if you want to trade altcoins not listed on that exchange, you will have to transfer your BTC or ETH to a larger exchange like Binance, and buy the altcoin you want, using whichever trading pair that is best suited (BTC and ETH pairs are most common).
As we have already explained, if you are buying Bitcoin or any cryptocurrencies, you should invest in a wallet to safely store your coins. It is not advisable to store your BTC or other crypto on the exchanges for too long, due to hacking and other risks. “ “Directly through Exchanges
Step Two: Determine your Strategy
There are different ways to invest. You need to find a strategy that works for you and your specific set of skills. The value of a cryptocurrency is not defined by a formula or something out a textbook. If everyone was able to calculate the actual value of a share of stock, for example, or a bond, or other tradeable asset, then the price on an open market exchange would never move. Buyers and sellers would know exactly how much the asset is worth, so there would be no reason to sell lower or buy higher than the actual value.
You need to come up with your own ideas and strategies to take advantage of market moves. Sometimes you will have a position that is contrary to the general market. Other times you might be trading in agreement with a majority of other market participants. Investors are basically separable into one of two groups of thinkers. Contrarian investors go against the crowd, swimming against the current; Momentum investors ride the wave feeling secure in the majority. Being different can be good or it can be bad. You do not always want to necessarily get caught up in the most crowded trade. “ “Things to keep in Mind
Bitcoin Futures
We need to mention the bitcoin futures market as another potential way to invest. Toward the close of 2017, Bitcoin started trading on two fully recognized and well-established futures markets; the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE), and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange CME.
The key quote from the exchanges was “because the futures can be traded on regulated markets, it will attract investors, making the market liquid, stabilizing prices and it will not suffer from low transaction speeds of Bitcoin Exchanges.”
For a risk averse investor, this offers a safer entry into cryptocurrency investing. A futures contract commits its owner to buy or sell the underlying asset, BTC, at a set price, and at a set date in the future. The investor in the futures contract does not actually own the underlying asset, but rather is trading on fluctuations in the price of the asset over a certain timeframe, as specified in the futures contract. “ “Things to keep in Mind §2
Common Pitfalls We cannot conclude this lesson without one more look at the common pitfalls a new cryptocurrency investor should avoid.
The problem areas are: -Falling for scams by failing to carry out due diligence. -Relying solely upon self-acclaimed crypto gurus and experts. If you want to trade, you must understand how to read news and charts for yourself. -Too much Greed. Not taking profit when you should. It is better to take a 20% gain, than wait for a 100% gain, only to lose it all in the end. -Lacking an investment strategy or exit plan. -Not sticking to your investment plan or strategy. -Allowing emotions to rule your decisions. Chasing your losses. -Investing what you cannot afford to lose.
And finally, some time-tested wisdom from Wall Street: Bulls make money. Bears make money. Pigs get slaughtered every time. (Don’t be greedy!)
We cannot overemphasize the risk involved in cryptocurrency investing. The potential to make huge gains over a short period of time does not come without risk. There is no doubt that significant players in the global financial markets are entering the cryptocurrency markets too. We are likely to witness more and more government authorities trying to regulate cryptocurrencies, hopefully to the overall benefit of a healthy market. It seems safe to say we will see cryptocurrencies become more mainstream due to the intense interest from the traditional financial industry and institutional investing community all over the world. What are better ways to successfully invest in cryptocurrencies? Which pitfalls should you avoid? Learn all on successful ICOs and STOs after reading the full lesson: UBAI.co How to start your STO/ICO campaign in 2019? Contact me via Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn to know more about our education: Facebook LinkedIn Instagram
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5 Most Selling Books To Learn Bitcoin-easy for beginners.

5 Most Selling Books To Learn Bitcoin-easy for beginners.
5 Best Books About Bitcoin
Nathaniel Popper, a reporter at The New York Times who covers finance and technology, chronicles the history of the earliest bitcoin supporters in his 2015 book, including the stories of key players like the Winklevoss twins, Cameron and Tyler (who reportedly became the first "bitcoin billionaires" when the cryptocurrency's value breached $10,000 in November) and bitcoin's mysterious creator Satoshi Nakamoto.
"Bitcoin may be a product of computer science, but it is a very human story. ... This highly entertaining history reminds us yet again that truth can be stranger than fiction," former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers says of the book.
2. "Cryptoassets: The Innovative Investor's Guide to Bitcoin and Beyond" by Chris Burniske and Jack Tatar
Chris Burniske, partner at crypto-focused venture capital firm Placeholder Capital, and Jack Tatar, a frequent author on personal finance, published a "how-to" guide for investing in bitcoin and other digital assets. Their 2017 book discusses how to value cryptocurrencies, when to invest, and "tips to navigate inevitable bubbles and manias," according to the book's website.
"Informative and actionable, Cryptoassets is a must-read for crypto-enthusiasts and capital market investors alike," Arthur Laffer, a member of former President Ronald Reagan's Economic Policy Advisory Board, says of the book.
3. "Blockchain Revolution" by Don Tapscott and Alex Tapscott
Bitcoin uses a technology called blockchain, which is a digital ledger. (Check out CNBC's explainer here.) Blockchain experts Don Tapscott and Alex Tapscott explore how the technology could impact global systems in their 2016 book. The father and son pair co-founded the Blockchain Research Institute, a Canadian think tank with backing from companies like Microsoft, IBM, FedEx and PepsiCo. Forbes named Don Tapscott the second most influential business thinker in 2017.
"The Tapscotts have written the book, literally, on how to survive and thrive in this next wave of technology-driven disruption. Likely to become one of the iconic books of our time," says Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen.
4. "The Age of Cryptocurrency" by Paul Vigna and Michael J. Casey
Wall Street Journal reporters Paul Vigna and Michael J. Casey seek to explain how a world run on digital money would differ from today's system of tangible cash, banks, checkbooks, gold and credit cards in their 2015 book.
For example, the book's opening anecdote about a woman in Afghanistan with no bank account accessing money through cryptocurrency shows the kinds of change technology can bring, Fortunenotes in a review.
"Vigna and Casey's thorough, timely and colorful book is a rewarding place to learn about it all," according to a review in The New York Times.
5. "American Kingpin" by Nick Bilton
American Kingpin
This book tells the story of Ross Ulbricht, creator of the Silk Road, who built the dark web e-commerce site into a $1.2 billion platform for drugs, guns and anything else illegal.
One of Amazon's 100 Best Books of 2017, Apple's Best Book of 2017 and a New York Times "Editor's Choice" best-seller, bitcoin enthusiasts can read about the role cryptocurrency played. Nick Bilton is a special correspondent for Vanity Fair, a former reporter for The New York Times and a contributor to CNBC.
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Winklevoss twins claim famed crypto evangelist stole 5,000 bitcoins from them

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 54%. (I'm a bot)
Two of the world's most famous bitcoin investors, the Winklevoss twins, have now sued a longtime figure in the world of bitcoin, Charlie Shrem.
Shrem was released from prison in 2016 after he was convicted for aiding and abetting an unlicensed money-transfer business-sending $1 million in bitcoins that ended up on the notorious drug website, Silk Road. According to the new lawsuit-which was filed in federal court in Manhattan in September 2018 and only recently unsealed-Winklevoss Capital Fund hired Shrem in late 2012 to purchase bitcoins on its behalf.
The company now claims that Shrem pocketed the difference to "Purchase 5,000 bitcoin for himself."
The investment firm is asking for the 5,000 bitcoins back, which at present exchange rates would be worth over $31.3 million.
In any case, citing blockchain analysis, WCF said in the lawsuit that the analysis can definitively show that Shrem soon took those 5,000 bitcoins and transferred them to a vanity wallet address that contained the string "1Shrem."
Shrem has been on a steadily increasing buying spree since July of last year, paying cash for more than $4 million in real estate in and around Sarasota, Florida, two Maseratis, and two power boats.
Summary Source | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: bitcoin#1 Shrem#2 Two#3 million#4 purchase#5
Post found in /technology.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
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Cryptocurrencies plunge for the week with Bitcoin still below USD$6,550, forecasters project 54% per annum growth in the Cryptocurrency ATM industry over 5 years and Coinbase explores launching a Bitcoin ETF with BlackRock

Developments in Financial Services

Regulatory Environment

General News

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Remember the Winklevoss twins pandering to Lawsky in 2014 ?

Remember how Overreaching Double Dealing Lawsky was summoning people to testify in January 2014 ?
The bitcoin community was talking about the Winklevoss twins testifying in from of him. The next day there was another guy testifying, his name is Cyrus Vance Jr. He was trying to close Silk Road before the FBI.
If you don't remember you can see the video here: https://youtu.be/6EPzoxTAcAI?t=2m42s
Cyrus Vance Jr. is testifying: "it is my position that digital currency exchanges should be required to obtain licenses as money transmitters in order to do business in New York State, and therefore, come under this regulatory framework."
2017 is reelection season and Cyrus Vance Jr. is running for reelection and at a political forum, I asked him about Encryption and you can hear his answer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1X6gdWCS18
The video is broken in three parts and in reverse; you can hear the result of the vote for his endorsement, the internal debate of what members think of Cyrus Vance (minute 2), and you can hear his answer to me on Encryption (minute 9). At the end he lost the club endorsement. "No Endorsement" got 26 votes, "Cyrus Vance Jr." got 2 votes, and a "Write In" got 1 vote. He might get reelected in 2017 but I did open the door for challengers for 2021.
I can't tell you the pleasure I felt when the Manhattan DA did not get the endorsement but it does show that when New Yorkers are presented with REAL FACTS, they do side on the correct one.
Please share the Bitcoin Foundation message about how you can help beat the Bitcoin Bitlicense: https://bitcoinfoundation.org/bitlicense-theo-chino
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Book project: assistance that would be welcomed

Here is my rough to-do list.
.
I have the press coverage of the pirateat40 scheme's collapse and his arrest. Has anyone written up the story? Interested in how he got started, why anyone thought this could be anything other than an Ponzi. I understand he traded on good reputation on the boards.
I think I have the material here. Hard part will be in digesting it into 500-1500 words.
Probably more likely on the 1500 words side, Silk Road is super-important to the history of Bitcoin. Need to cover dark markets in general and their propensity for exit scams.
The $400 RPi is a silly little scam, but the VC presentation is powerfully illustrative.
This will be work, but if I can pull it off this will be one of the most useful bits of original work in this entire saga. The hard part will be explaining what a stupendous pain in the arse rights management is, and why having smart contracts manage it for you sounds like a dream come true.
an optional sideshow, but may be of interest: when people from the rich privileged classes try to do this Bitcoin stuff above-board and it still doesn't work.
To illustrate why trusting exchanges is a bad idea: they're all run by incompetent scammy idiots with ludicrously awful software. I've written up Mt Gox and Bitfinex in full ... Is there a handy list anywhere I could crib from?
I don't understand the "equity" bit of their haircut compensation offer, but arguably neither do they.
Things that are matters of human judgement, and they put forward Smart Contracts as the solution. (Fishing regulation, good Lord.) This may just be a couple of paragraphs in passing.
These are arguably relevant, but they're also tangential. Paycoin is only tangentially an altcoin and mostly just a straight-up scam, for example.
.
Is there anything I've forgotten? Anything you'd really like a short book on why this is all rubbish to cover?
Current status: 16,622 words of draft as I write this. I expect to hit 20-25,000 then edit it down from there, final Kindle Short likely 15-20,000 words. I'll probably post another excerpt from the draft this evening or tomorrow (probably tomorrow).
I thank you, my fellow freedom-hating statist banker shills, for your assistance. Rest assured that Goldman Sachs and the Elders of Zion will leave a special something in your pay packets this month!
submitted by dgerard to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

The wilkelvoss are trying to make bitcoin legit according to esquire magazine

Every idea needs a face, even if the faces are illusory simplifications. The country you get is the president you get. The Yankees you get is the shortstop you get. Apple needed Jobs. ISIS needs al-Baghdadi. The moon shot belongs to Bezos. There's nothing under the Facebook sun that doesn't come back to Zuckerberg.
But there is, as yet, no face behind the bitcoin curtain. It's the currency you've heard about but haven't been able to understand. Still to this day nobody knows who created it. For most people, it has something to do with programmable cash and algorithms and the deep space of mathematics, but it also has something to do with heroin and barbiturates and the sex trade and bankruptcies, too. It has no face because it doesn't seem tangible or real. We might align it with an anarchist's riot mask or a highly conceptualized question mark, but those images truncate its reality. Certain economists say it's as important as the birth of the Internet, that it's like discovering ice. Others are sure that it's doomed to melt. In the political sphere, it is the darling of the cypherpunks and libertarians. When they're not busy ignoring it, it scares the living shit out of the big banks and credit-card companies.
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It sparked to life in 2008—when all the financial world prepared for itself the articulate noose—and it knocked on the door like some inconvenient relative arriving at the dinner party in muddy shoes and a knit hat. Fierce ideological battles are currently being waged among the people who own and shepherd the currency. Some shout, Ponzi scheme. Some shout, Gold dust. Bitcoin alone is worth billions of dollars, but the computational structure behind it—its blockchain and its sidechains—could become the absolute underpinning of the world's financial structure for decades to come.
What bitcoin has needed for years is a face to legitimize it, sanitize it, make it palpable to all the naysayers. But it has no Larry Ellison, no Elon Musk, no noticeable visionaries either with or without the truth. There's a lot of ideology at stake. A lot of principle and dogma and creed. And an awful lot of cash, too.
At 6:00 on a Wednesday winter morning, three months after launching Gemini, their bitcoin exchange, Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss step out onto Broadway in New York, wearing the same make of sneakers, the same type of shorts, their baseball caps turned backward. They don't quite fall into the absolute caricature of twindom: They wear different-colored tops. Still, it's difficult to tell them apart, where Tyler ends and Cameron begins. Their faces are sculpted from another era, as if they had stepped from the ruin of one of Gatsby's parties. Their eyes are quick and seldom land on anything for long. Now thirty-four, there is something boyishly earnest about them as they jog down Prince Street, braiding in and out of each other, taking turns talking, as if they were working in shifts, drafting off each other.
Forget, for a moment, the four things the Winklevosses are most known for: suing Mark Zuckerberg, their portrayal in The Social Network, rowing in the Beijing Olympics, and their overwhelming public twinness. Because the Winklevoss brothers are betting just about everything—including their past—on a fifth thing: They want to shake the soul of money out.
At the deep end of their lives, they are athletes. Rowers. Full stop. And the thing about rowing—which might also be the thing about bitcoin—is that it's just about impossible to get your brain around its complexity. Everyone thinks you're going to a picnic. They have this notion you're out catching butterflies. They might ask you if you've got your little boater's hat ready. But it's not like that at all. You're fifteen years old. You rise in the dark. You drag your carcass along the railroad tracks before dawn. The boathouse keys are cold to the touch. You undo the ropes. You carry a shell down to the river. The carbon fiber rips at your hands. You place the boat in the water. You slip the oars in the locks. You wait for your coach. Nothing more than a thumb of light in the sky. It's still cold and the river stinks. That heron hasn't moved since yesterday. You hear Coach's voice before you see him. On you go, lads. You start at a dead sprint. The left rib's a little sore, but you don't say a thing. You are all power and no weight. The first push-to-pull in the water is a ripping surprise. From the legs first. Through the whole body. The arc. Atomic balance. A calm waiting for the burst. Your chest burns, your thighs scald, your brain blanks. It feels as if your rib cage might shatter. You are stillness exploding. You catch the water almost without breaking the surface. Coach says something about the pole vault. You like him. You really do. That brogue of his. Lads this, lads that. Fire. Stamina. Pain. After two dozen strokes, it already feels like you're hitting the wall. All that glycogen gone. Nobody knows. Nobody. They can't even pronounce it. Rowing. Ro-wing. Roh-ing. You push again, then pull. You feel as if you are breaking branch after branch off the bottom of your feet. You don't rock. You don't jolt. Keep it steady. Left, right, left, right. The heron stays still. This river. You see it every day. Nothing behind you. Everything in front. You cross the line. You know the exact tree. Your chest explodes. Your knees are trembling. This is the way the world will end, not with a whimper but a bang. You lean over the side of the boat. Up it comes, the breakfast you almost didn't have. A sign of respect to the river. You lay back. Ah, blue sky. Some cloud. Some gray. Do it again, lads. Yes, sir. You row so hard you puke it up once more. And here comes the heron, it's moving now, over the water, here it comes, look at that thing glide.
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The Winklevoss twins in the men's pair final during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. GETTY There's plenty of gin and beer and whiskey in the Harrison Room in downtown Manhattan, but the Winklevoss brothers sip Coca-Cola. The room, one of many in the newly renovated Pier A restaurant, is all mahogany and lamplight. It is, in essence, a floating bar, jutting four hundred feet out into the Hudson River. From the window you can see the Statue of Liberty. It feels entirely like their sort of room, a Jazz Age expectation hovering around their initial appearance—tall, imposing, the hair mannered, the collars of their shirts slightly tilted—but then they just slide into their seats, tentative, polite, even introverted.
They came here by subway early on a Friday evening, and they lean back in their seats, a little wary, their eyes busy—as if they want to look beyond the rehearsal of their words.
They had the curse of privilege, but, as they're keen to note, a curse that was earned. Their father worked to pay his way at a tiny college in backwoods Pennsylvania coal country. He escaped the small mining town and made it all the way to a professorship at Wharton. He founded his own company and eventually created the comfortable upper-middle-class family that came with it. They were raised in Greenwich, Connecticut, the most housebroken town on the planet. They might have looked like the others in their ZIP code, and dressed like them, spoke like them, but they didn't quite feel like them. Some nagging feeling—close to anger, close to fear—lodged itself beneath their shoulders, not quite a chip but an ache. They wanted Harvard but weren't quite sure what could get them there. "You have to be basically the best in the world at something if you're coming from Greenwich," says Tyler. "Otherwise it's like, great, you have a 1600 SAT, you and ten thousand others, so what?"
The rowing was a means to an end, but there was also something about the boat that they felt allowed another balance between them. They pulled their way through high school, Cameron on the port-side oar, Tyler on the starboard. They got to Harvard. The Square was theirs. They rowed their way to the national championships—twice. They went to Oxford. They competed in the Beijing Olympics. They sucked up the smog. They came in sixth place. The cameras loved them. Girls, too. They were so American, sandy-haired, blue-eyed, they could have been cast in a John Cougar Mellencamp song.
It might all have been so clean-cut and whitebread except for the fact that—at one of the turns in the river—they got involved in the most public brawl in the whole of the Internet's nascent history.
They don't talk about it much anymore, but they know that it still defines them, not so much in their own minds but in the minds of others. The story seems simple on one level, but nothing is ever simple, not even simplification. Theirs was the original idea for the first social network, Harvard Connection. They hired Mark Zuckerberg to build it. Instead he went off and created Facebook. They sued him. They settled for $65 million. It was a world of public spats and private anguish. Rumors and recriminations. A few years later, dusty old pre-Facebook text messages were leaked online by Silicon Alley Insider: "Yeah, I'm going to fuck them," wrote Zuckerberg to a friend. "Probably in the ear." The twins got their money, but then they believed they were duped again by an unfairly low evaluation of their stock. They began a second round of lawsuits for $180 million. There was even talk about the Supreme Court. It reeked of opportunism. But they wouldn't let it go. In interviews, they came across as insolent and splenetic, tossing their rattles out of the pram. It wasn't about the money, they said at the time, it was about fairness, reality, justice. Most people thought it was about some further agile fuckery, this time in Zuckerberg's ear.
There are many ways to tell the story, but perhaps the most penetrating version is that they weren't screwed so much by Zuckerberg as they were by their eventual portrayal in the film version of their lives. They appeared querulous and sulky, exactly the type of characters that America, peeling off the third-degree burns of the great recession, needed to hate. While the rest of the country worried about mounting debt and vanishing jobs, they were out there drinking champagne from, at the very least, Manolo stilettos. The truth would never get in the way of a good story. In Aaron Sorkin's world, and on just about every Web site, the blueblood trust-fund boys got what was coming to them. And the best thing now was for them to take their Facebook money and turn the corner, quickly, away, down toward whatever river would whisk them away.
Armie Hammer brilliantly portrayed them as the bluest of bloods in The Social Network. When the twins are questioned about those times now, they lean back a little in their seats, as if they've just lost a long race, a little perplexed that they came off as the victims of Hollywood's ability to throw an image, while the whole rip-roaring regatta still goes on behind them. "They put us in a box," says Cameron, "caricatured to a point where we didn't really exist." He glances around the bar, drums his finger against the glass. "That's fair enough. I understand that impulse." They smart a little when they hear Zuckerberg's name. "I don't think Mark liked being called an asshole," says Tyler, with a flick of bluster in his eyes, but then he catches himself. "You know, maybe Mark doesn't care. He's a bit of a statesman now, out there connecting the world. I have nothing against him. He's a smart guy."
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. But underneath the calm—just like underneath the boat—one can sense the churn.
They say the word—ath-letes—as if it were a country where pain is the passport. One of the things the brothers mention over and over again is that you can spontaneously crack a rib while rowing, just from the sheer exertion of the muscles hauling on the rib cage.
Along came bitcoin.
At its most elemental, bitcoin is a virtual currency. It's the sort of thing a five-year-old can understand—It's just e-cash, Mom—until he reaches eighteen and he begins to question the deep future of what money really means. It is a currency without government. It doesn't need a banker. It doesn't need a bank. It doesn't even need a brick to be built upon. Its supporters say that it bypasses the Man. It is less than a decade old and it has already come through its own Wild West, a story rooted in uncharted digital territory, up from the dust, an evening redness in the arithmetical West.
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. Bitcoin appeared in 2008—westward ho!—a little dot on the horizon of the Internet. It was the brainchild of a computer scientist named Satoshi Nakamoto. The first sting in the tale is that—to this very day—nobody knows who Nakamoto is, where he lives, or how much of his own invention he actually owns. He could be Californian, he could be Australian, he could even be a European conglomerate, but it doesn't really matter, since what he created was a cryptographic system that is borderless and supposedly unbreakable.
In the beginning the currency was ridiculed and scorned. It was money created from ones and zeros. You either bought it or you had to "mine" for it. If you were mining, your computer was your shovel. Any nerd could do it. You keyed your way in. By using your computer to help check and confirm the bitcoin transactions of others, you made coin. Everyone in this together. The computer heated up and mined, down down down, into the mathematical ground, lifting up numbers, making and breaking camp every hour or so until you had your saddlebags full of virtual coin. It all seemed a bit of a lark at first. No sheriff, no deputy, no central bank. The only saloon was a geeky chat room where a few dozen bitcoiners gathered to chew data.
Lest we forget, money was filthy in 2008.
The collapse was coming. The banks were shorting out. The real estate market was a confederacy of dunces. Bernie Madoff's shadow loomed. Occupy was on the horizon. And all those Wall Street yahoos were beginning to squirm.
Along came bitcoin like some Jesse James of the financial imagination. It was the biggest disruption of money since coins. Here was an idea that could revolutionize the financial world. A communal articulation of a new era. Fuck American Express. Fuck Western Union. Fuck Visa. Fuck the Fed. Fuck the Treasury. Fuck the deregulated thievery of the twenty-first century.
To the earliest settlers, bitcoin suggested a moral way out. It was a money created from the ground up, a currency of the people, by the people, for the people, with all government control extinguished. It was built on a solid base of blockchain technology where everyone participated in the protection of the code. It attracted anarchists, libertarians, whistle-blowers, cypherpunks, economists, extropians, geeks, upstairs, downstairs, left-wing, right-wing. Sure, it could be used by businesses and corporations, but it could also be used by poor people and immigrants to send money home, instantly, honestly, anonymously, without charge, with a click of the keyboard. Everyone in the world had access to your transaction, but nobody had to know your name. It bypassed the suits. All you needed to move money was a phone or a computer. It was freedom of economic action, a sort of anarchy at its democratic best, no rulers, just rules.
Bitcoin, to the original explorers, was a safe pass through the government-occupied valleys: Those assholes were up there in the hills, but they didn't have any scopes on their rifles, and besides, bitcoin went through in communal wagons at night.
Ordinary punters took a shot. Businesses, too. You could buy silk ties in Paris without any extra bank charges. You could protect your money in Buenos Aires without fear of a government grab.
The Winklevoss twins leave the U.S. Court of Appeals in 2011, after appearing in court to ask that the previous settlement case against Facebook be voided. GETTY But freedom can corrupt as surely as power. It was soon the currency that paid for everything illegal under the sun, the go-to money of the darknet. The westward ho! became the outlaw territory of Silk Road and beyond. Heroin through the mail. Cocaine at your doorstep. Child porn at a click. What better way for terrorists to ship money across the world than through a network of anonymous computers? Hezbollah, the Taliban, the Mexican cartels. In Central America, kidnappers began demanding ransom in bitcoin—there was no need for the cash to be stashed under a park bench anymore. Now everything could travel down the wire. Grab, gag, and collect. Uranium could be paid for in bitcoin. People, too. The sex trade was turned on: It was a perfect currency for Madame X. For the online gambling sites, bitcoin was pure jackpot.
For a while, things got very shady indeed. Over a couple years, the rate pinballed between $10 and $1,200 per bitcoin, causing massive waves and troughs of online panic and greed. (In recent times, it has begun to stabilize between $350 and $450.) In 2014, it was revealed that hackers had gotten into the hot wallet of Mt. Gox, a bitcoin exchange based in Tokyo. A total of 850,000 coins were "lost," at an estimated value of almost half a billion dollars. The founder of Silk Road, Ross William Ulbricht (known as "Dread Pirate Roberts"), got himself a four-by-six room in a federal penitentiary for life, not to mention pending charges for murder-for-hire in Maryland.
Everyone thought that bitcoin was the problem. The fact of the matter was, as it so often is, human nature was the problem. Money means desire. Desire means temptation. Temptation means that people get hurt.
During the first Gold Rush in the late 1840s, the belief was that all you needed was a pan and a decent pair of boots and a good dose of nerve and you could go out and make yourself a riverbed millionaire. Even Jack London later fell for the lure of it alongside thousands of others: the western test of manhood and the promise of wealth. What they soon found out was that a single egg could cost twenty-five of today's dollars, a pound of coffee went for a hundred, and a night in a whorehouse could set you back $6,000.
A few miners hit pay dirt, but what most ended up with for their troubles was a busted body and a nasty dose of syphilis.
The gold was discovered on the property of John Sutter in Sacramento, but the one who made the real cash was a neighboring merchant, Samuel Brannan. When Brannan heard the news of the gold nuggets, he bought up all the pickaxes and shovels he could find, filled a quinine bottle with gold dust, and went to San Francisco. Word went around like a prayer in a flash flood: gold gold gold. Brannan didn't wildcat for gold himself, but at the peak of the rush he was flogging $5,000 worth of shovels a day—that's $155,000 today—and went on to become the wealthiest man in California, alongside the Wells Fargo crew, Levi Strauss, and the Studebaker family, who sold wheelbarrows.
If you comb back through the Winklevoss family, you will find a great-grandfather and a great-great-grandfather who knew a thing or two about digging: They worked side by side in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. They didn't go west and they didn't get rich, but maybe the lesson became part of their DNA: Sometimes it's the man who sells the shovels who ends up hitting gold.
Like it or not—and many people don't like it—the Winklevoss brothers are shaping up to be the Samuel Brannans of the bitcoin world.
Nine months after being portrayed in The Social Network, the Winklevoss twins were back out on the water at the World Rowing Cup. CHRISTOPHER LEE/GETTY They heard about it first poolside in Ibiza, Spain. Later it would play into the idea of ease and privilege: umbrella drinks and girls in bikinis. But if the creation myth was going to be flippant, the talk was serious. "I'd say we were cautious, but we were definitely intrigued," says Cameron. They went back home to New York and began to read. There was something about it that got under their skin. "We knew that money had been so broken and inefficient for years," says Tyler, "so bitcoin appealed to us right away."
They speak in braided sentences, catching each other, reassuring themselves, tightening each other's ideas. They don't quite want to say that bitcoin looked like something that might be redemptive—after all, they, like everyone else, were looking to make money, lots of it, Olympic-sized amounts—but they say that it did strike an idealistic chord inside them. They certainly wouldn't be cozying up to the anarchists anytime soon, but this was a global currency that, despite its uncertainties, seemed to present a solution to some of the world's more pressing problems. "It was borderless, instantaneous, irreversible, decentralized, with virtually no transaction costs," says Tyler. It could possibly cut the banks out, and it might even take the knees out from under the credit-card companies. Not only that, but the price, at just under ten dollars per coin, was in their estimation low, very low. They began to snap it up.
They were aware, even at the beginning, that they might, once again, be called Johnny-come-latelys, just hopping blithely on the bandwagon—it was 2012, already four years into the birth of the currency—but they went ahead anyway, power ten. Within a short time they'd spent $11 million buying up a whopping 1 percent of the world's bitcoin, a position they kept up as more bitcoins were mined, making their 1 percent holding today worth about $66 million.
But bitcoin was flammable. The brothers felt the burn quickly. Their next significant investment came later that year, when they gave $1.5 million in venture funding to a nascent exchange called BitInstant. Within a year the CEO was arrested for laundering drug money through the exchange.
So what were a pair of smart, clean-cut Olympic rowers doing hanging around the edges of something so apparently shady, and what, if anything, were they going to do about it?
They mightn't have thought of it this way, but there was something of the sheriff striding into town, the one with the swagger and the scar, glancing up at the balconies as he comes down Main Street, all tumbleweeds and broken pianos. This place was a dump in most people's eyes, but the sheriff glimpsed his last best shot at finally getting the respect he thinks he deserves.
The money shot: A good stroke will catch the water almost without breaking its seal. You stir without rippling. Your silence is sinewy. There's muscle in that calm. The violence catches underneath, thrusts the boat along. Stroke after stroke. Just keep going. Today's truth dies tomorrow. What you have to do is elemental enough. You row without looking behind you. You keep the others in front of you. As long as you can see what they're doing, it's all in your hands. You are there to out-pain them. Doesn't matter who they are, where they come from, how they got here. Know your enemy through yourself. Push through toward pull. Find the still point of this pain. Cut a melody in the disk of your flesh. The only terror comes when they pass you—if they ever pass you.
There are no suits or ties, but there is a white hum in the offices of Gemini in the Flatiron District. The air feels as if it has been brushed clean. There is something so everywhereabout the place. Ergonomic chairs. iPhone portals. Rows of flickering computers. Not so much a hush around the room as a quiet expectation. Eight, nine people. Programmers, analysts, assistants. Other employees—teammates, they call them—dialing in from Portland, Oregon, and beyond.
The brothers fire up the room when they walk inside. A fist-pump here, a shoulder touch there. At the same time, there is something almost shy about them. Apart, they seem like casual visitors to the space they inhabit. It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long.
The Winklevoss twins speak onstage at Bitcoin! Let's Cut Through the Noise Already at SXSW in 2016. GETTY They move from desk to desk. The price goes up, the price goes down. The phones ring. The e-mails beep. Customer-service calls. Questions about fees. Inquiries about tax structures.
Gemini was started in late 2015 as a next-generation bitcoin exchange. It is not the first such exchange in the world by any means, but it is one of the most watched. The company is designed with ordinary investors in mind, maybe a hedge fund, maybe a bank: all those people who used to be confused or even terrified by the word bitcoin. It is insured. It is clean. What's so fascinating about this venture is that the brothers are risking themselves by trying to eliminate risk: keeping the boat steady and exploding through it at the same time.
It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long. For the past couple years, the Winklevosses have worked closely with just about every compliance agency imaginable. They ticked off all the regulatory boxes. Essentially they wanted to ease all the Debting Thomases. They put regulatory frameworks in place. Security and bankability and insurance were their highest objectives. Nobody was going to be able to blow open the safe. They wanted to soothe all the appetites for risk. They told Bitcoin Magazine they were asking for "permission, not forgiveness."
This is where bitcoin can become normal—that is, if you want bitcoin to be normal.
Just a mile or two down the road, in Soho, a half dozen bitcoiners gather at a meetup. The room is scruffy, small, boxy. A half mannequin is propped on a table, a scarf draped around it. It's the sort of place that twenty years ago would have been full of cigarette smoke. There's a bit of Allen Ginsberg here, a touch of Emma Goldman, a lot of Zuccotti Park. The wine is free and the talk is loose. These are the true believers. They see bitcoin in its clearest possible philosophical terms—the frictionless currency of the people, changing the way people move money around the world, bypassing the banks, disrupting the status quo.
A comedy show is being run out in the backyard. A scruffy young man wanders in and out, announcing over and over again that he is half-baked. A well-dressed Asian girl sidles up to the bar. She looks like she's just stepped out of an NYU business class. She's interested in discovering what bitcoin is. She is regaled by a series of convivial answers. The bartender tells her that bitcoin is a remaking of the prevailing power structures. The girl asks for another glass of wine. The bartender adds that bitcoin is democracy, pure and straight. She nods and tells him that the wine tastes like cooking oil. He laughs and says it wasn't bought with bitcoin. "I don't get it," she says. And so the evening goes, presided over by Margaux Avedisian, who describes herself as the queen of bitcoin. Avedisian, a digital-currency consultant of Armenian descent, is involved in several high-level bitcoin projects. She has appeared in documentaries and on numerous panels. She is smart, sassy, articulate.
When the talk turns to the Winklevoss brothers, the bar turns dark. Someone, somewhere, reaches up to take all the oxygen out of the air. Avedisian leans forward on the counter, her eyes shining, delightful, raged.
"The Winklevii are not the face of bitcoin," she says. "They're jokes. They don't know what they're saying. Nobody in our community respects them. They're so one-note. If you look at their exchange, they have no real volume, they never will. They keep throwing money at different things. Nobody cares. They're not part of us. They're just hangers-on."
"Ah, they're just assholes," the bartender chimes in.
"What they want to do," says Avedisian, "is lobotomize bitcoin, make it into something entirely vapid. They have no clue."
The Asian girl leaves without drinking her third glass of free wine. She's got a totter in her step. She doesn't quite get the future of money, but then again maybe very few in the world do.
Giving testimony on bitcoin licensing before the New York State Department of Financial Services in 2014. LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS The future of money might look like this: You're standing on Oxford Street in London in winter. You think about how you want to get to Charing Cross Road. The thought triggers itself through electrical signals into the chip embedded in your wrist. Within a moment, a driverless car pulls up on the sensor-equipped road. The door opens. You hop in. The car says hello. You tell it to shut up. It does. It already knows where you want to go. It turns onto Regent Street. You think,A little more air-conditioning, please. The vents blow. You think, Go a little faster, please. The pace picks up. You think, This traffic is too heavy, use Quick(TM). The car swings down Glasshouse Street. You think, Pay the car in front to get out of my way. It does. You think, Unlock access to a shortcut. The car turns down Sherwood Street to Shaftsbury Avenue. You pull in to Charing Cross. You hop out. The car says goodbye. You tell it to shut up again. You run for the train and the computer chip in your wrist pays for the quiet-car ticket for the way home.
All of these transactions—the air-conditioning, the pace, the shortcut, the bribe to get out of the way, the quick lanes, the ride itself, the train, maybe even the "shut up"—will cost money. As far as crypto-currency enthusiasts think, it will be paid for without coins, without phones, without glass screens, just the money coming in and going out of your preprogrammed wallet embedded beneath your skin.
The Winklevosses are betting that the money will be bitcoin. And that those coins will flow through high-end, corporate-run exchanges like Gemini rather than smoky SoHo dives.
Cameron leans across a table in a New York diner, the sort of place where you might want to polish your fork just in case, and says: "The future is here, it's just not evenly distributed yet." He can't remember whom the quote belongs to, but he freely acknowledges that it's not his own. Theirs is a truculent but generous intelligence, capable of surprise and turn at the oddest of moments. They talk meditation, they talk economics, they talk Van Halen, they talk, yes, William Gibson, but everything comes around again to bitcoin.
"The key to all this is that people aren't even going to know that they're using bitcoin," says Tyler. "It's going to be there, but it's not going to be exposed to the end user. Bitcoin is going to be the rails that underpin our payment systems. It's just like an IP address. We don't log on to a series of numbers, 115.425.5 or whatever. No, we log on to Google.com. In the same way, bitcoin is going to be disguised. There will be a body kit that makes it user-friendly. That's what makes bitcoin a kick-ass currency."
Any fool can send a billion dollars across the world—as long as they have it, of course—but it's virtually impossible to send a quarter unless you stick it in an envelope and pay forty-nine cents for a stamp. It's one of the great ironies of our antiquated money system. And yet the quark of the financial world is essentially the small denomination. What bitcoin promises is that it will enable people and businesses to send money in just about any denomination to one another, anywhere in the world, for next to nothing. A public address, a private key, a click of the mouse, and the money is gone.
A Bitcoin conference in New York City in 2014. GETTY This matters. This matters a lot. Credit-card companies can't do this. Neither can the big banks under their current systems. But Marie-Louise on the corner of Libertador Avenue can. And so can Pat Murphy in his Limerick housing estate. So can Mark Andreessen and Bill Gates and Laurene Powell Jobs. Anyone can do it, anywhere in the world, at virtually no charge.
You can do it, in fact, from your phone in a diner in New York. But the whole time they are there—over identical California omelettes that they order with an ironic shrug—they never once open their phones. They come across more like the talkative guys who might buy you a drink at the sports bar than the petulants ordering bottle service in the VIP corner. The older they get, the more comfortable they seem in their contradictions: the competition, the ease; the fame, the quiet; the gamble, the sure thing.
Bitcoin is what might eventually make them among the richest men in America. And yet. There is always a yet. What seems indisputable about the future of money, to the Winklevosses and other bitcoin adherents, is that the technology that underpins bitcoin—the blockchain—will become one of the fundamental tenets of how we deal with the world of finance. Blockchain is the core computer code. It's open source and peer to peer—in other words, it's free and open to you and me. Every single bitcoin transaction ever made goes to an open public ledger. It would take an unprecedented 51 percent attack—where one entity would come to control more than half of the computing power used to mine bitcoin—for hackers to undo it. The blockchain is maintained by computers all around the world, and its future sidechains will create systems that deal with contracts and stock and other payments. These sidechains could very well be the foundation of the new global economy for the big banks, the credit-card companies, and even government itself.
"It's boundless," says Cameron.
This is what the brothers are counting on—and what might eventually make them among the richest men in America.
And yet. There is always a yet.
When you delve into the world of bitcoin, it gets deeper, darker, more mysterious all the time. Why has its creator remained anonymous? Why did he drop off the face of the earth? How much of it does he own himself? Will banks and corporations try to bring the currency down? Why are there really only five developers with full "commit access" to the code (not the Winklevosses, by the way)? Who is really in charge of the currency's governance?
Perhaps the most pressing issue at hand is that of scaling, which has caused what amounts to a civil war among followers. A maximum block size of one megabyte has been imposed on the chain, sort of like a built-in artificial dampener to keep bitcoin punk rock. That's not nearly enough capacity for the number of transactions that would take place in future visions. In years to come, there could be massive backlogs and outages that could create instant financial panic. Bitcoin's most influential leaders are haggling over what will happen. Will bitcoin maintain its decentralized status, or will it go legit and open up to infinite transactions? And if it goes legit, where's the punk?
The issues are ongoing—and they might very well take bitcoin down, but the Winklevosses don't think so. They have seen internal disputes before. They've refrained from taking a public stance mostly because they know that there are a lot of other very smart people in bitcoin who are aware that crisis often builds consensus. "We're in this for the long haul," says Tyler. "We're the first batter in the first inning."
GILLIAN LAUB The waiter comes across and asks them, bizarrely, if they're twins. They nod politely. Who was born first? They've heard it a million times and their answer is always the same: Neither of them—they were born cesarean. Cameron looks older, says the waiter. Tyler grins. Normally it's the other way around, says Cameron, grinning back. Do you ever fight? asks the waiter. Every now and then, they say. But not over this, not over the future.
Heraclitus was wrong. You can, in fact, step in the same river twice. In the beginning you went to the shed. No electricity there, no heat, just a giant tub where you simulated the river. You could only do eleven strokes. But there was something about the repetition, the difference, even the monotony, that hooked you. After a while it wasn't an abandoned shed anymore. College gyms, national training centers. Bigger buildings. High ceilings. AC. Doctors and trainers. Monitors hooked up to your heart, your head, your blood. Six foot five, but even then you were not as tall as the other guys. You liked the notion of underdog. Everyone called you the opposite. The rich kids. The privileged ones. To hell with that. They don't know us, who we are, where we came from. Some of the biggest chips rest on the shoulders of those with the least to lose. Six foot five times two makes just about thirteen feet. You sit in the erg and you stare ahead. Day in, day out. One thousand strokes, two thousand. You work with the very best. You even train with the Navy SEALs. It touches that American part of you. The sentiment, the false optimism. When the oil fields are burning, you even think, I'll go there with them. But you stay in the boat. You want that other flag rising. That's what you aim for. You don't win but you get close. Afterward there are planes, galas, regattas, magazine spreads, but you always come back to that early river. The cold. The fierceness. The heron. Like it or not, you're never going to get off the water—that's just the fact of the matter, it's always going to be there. Hard to admit it, but once you were wrong. You got out of the boat and you haggled over who made it. You lost that one, hard. You might lose this one, too, but then again it just might be the original arc that you're stepping toward. So you return, then. You rise before dark. You drag your carcass along Broadway before dawn.
All the rich men in the world want to get shot into outer space. Richard Branson. Jeff Bezos. Elon Musk. The new explorers. To get the hell out of here and see if they—and maybe we—can exist somewhere else for a while. It's the story of the century. We want to know if the pocket of the universe can be turned inside out. We're either going to bring all the detritus of the world upward with us or we're going to find a brand-new way to exist. The cynical say that it's just another form of colonization—they're probably right, but then again maybe it's our only way out.
The Winklevosses have booked their tickets—numbers 700 and 701—on Branson's Virgin Galactic. Although they go virtually everywhere together, the twins want to go on different flights because of the risk involved: Now that they're in their mid-thirties, they can finally see death, or at least its rumor. It's a boy's adventure, but it's also the outer edge of possibility. It cost a quarter of a million dollars per seat, and they paid for it, yes, in bitcoin.
Of course, up until recently, the original space flights all splashed down into the sea. One of the ships that hauled the Gemini space capsule out of the water in 1965 was the Intrepid aircraft carrier.
The Winklevosses no longer pull their boat up the river. Instead they often run five miles along the Hudson to the Intrepid and back. The destroyer has been parked along Manhattan's West Side for almost as long as they have been alive. It's now a museum. The brothers like the boat, its presence, its symbolism: Intrepid, Gemini, the space shot.
They ease into the run.
submitted by thegrandknight to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What you need to know about bitcoin?

13 Things You Need to Know About Bitcoin
  1. The birth of Bitcoin
The origins of bitcoin trace back to 2008, when its creator, who went by the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto, published a proof of concept for Bitcoin. The proof was then published to a cryptocurrency mailing list in 2009. Nakamoto left the project in 2010 and disappeared, but other developers picked up the work. Bitcoin's birthday is Jan. 3, when Nakamoto mined the first 50 units of the currency.
  1. An elusive creator
The true identity of Bitcoin's creator has never been confirmed. Newsweek claimed to have found Bitcoin's creator in 2014, identifying Temple City, Calif., resident Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto. He has vigorously denied it. In 2015, an Australian entrepreneur named Craig Wright said he was Bitcoin's creator, but he couldn't produce the evidence to support his claim. Whoever Nakamoto is, that person is very rich, as the creator is estimated to have mined a million bitcoins in the currency’s early days.
  1. Very expensive pizza
The first transaction involving bitcoin was reported on May 22, 2010, when a programmer identified as Laszlo Hanyecz said he "successfully traded 10,000 bitcoins for pizza." As of Nov. 28, 2017, 10,000 bitcoins are worth about $99 million.
  1. You can spend bitcoins
While it may not seem like it, people continue to use bitcoins to buy stuff. The largest businesses to accept the cryptocurrency include Overstock.com, Expedia, Newegg and Dish.
  1. Federal Bureau of Bitcoin
At one point, the U.S. government was one of the largest holders of bitcoin. In 2013, after the FBI shut down Silk Road, a darknet site where people could buy drugs and other illicit goods and services, it took over bitcoin wallets controlled by the site, one of which held 144,000 bitcoins. Investors have been making a killing by bidding on government-seized bitcoins.
  1. A mountain-sized setback
In early 2014, Bitcoin suffered a devastating loss after the alleged hacking of Mt. Gox, a Japanese exchange. About $460 million of the currency (in 2014 value) was stolen. It was the largest loss of bitcoins ever and raised concerns about how secure the currency was.
  1. The billionaires' takes
Warren Buffett, perhaps the most famous investor in the world, was not so keen on Bitcoin one of the only times he addressed the currency. "Stay away from it. It's a mirage, basically," he told CNBC. "The idea that it has some huge intrinsic value is a joke in my view."
Fellow billionaire investor Jamie Dimon, chief executive of JPMorgan Chase, had even stronger words about Bitcoin: “You can’t have a business where people are going to invent a currency out of thin air. It won’t end well … someone is going to get killed and then the government is going to come down on it.”
But not all billionaires are against Bitcoin. Mark Cuban has said its value is inflated, but he recently invested in a venture capital fund that backs cryptocurrency. Richard Branson, however, has spoken more optimistically about it.
  1. Super wealthy twins and a smart teen
Other notable investors in Bitcoin include Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss (the Harvard-educated twins who sued Mark Zuckerberg claiming that Facebook was based on an idea they'd had). They bought $11 million worth of Bitcoin in 2013, an amount said to be about 1 percent of all bitcoins in circulation at that time. When Bitcoin's value reached more than $11,000 in early December, the twins were declared the first Bitcoin billionaires. The Winklevoss twins have been petitioning the SEC to create a bitcoin exchange traded fund. The agency rejected the idea earlier this year.
Another is investor and entrepreneur Erik Finman, who invested $1,000 into Bitcoin when he was 14 years old and is now a millionaire.
  1. Celebrities want in
Celebrities have also expressed enthusiasm for the cryptocurrency. Actor and Goop founder Gwyneth Paltrow advises Abra, a Bitcoin wallet, and Ashton Kutcher, Nas and Floyd Mayweather have all invested in Bitcoin startups.
  1. Support from a big financial institution
In August 2017, Fidelity Investments became a rare standout among financial institutions in embracing Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The company allows its clients to use the Fidelity website to view their bitcoin holdings held through digital wallet provider Coinbase. "This is an experiment in the spirit of learning what these crypto assets are like and how our customers may want to interact with them," Hadley Stern, senior vice president and managing director at Fidelity Labs, told Reuters.
  1. A hard fork
On Aug. 1, 2017, Bitcoin experienced what's being called a "hard fork" as a result of a few issues, including the limited number of transactions that can be processed per second. Essentially, the cryptocurrency split into two, with Bitcoin Cash debuting. Here's how Rob Marvin of PCMag explains the situation: "The Bitcoin fork speaks to a fundamental ideological rift over what's more important: preserving the decentralized nature and independent control of the Bitcoin network, or accelerating transaction speeds to make the cryptocurrency more viable for mainstream ecommerce and payments." Bitcoin Cash allows larger blocks of currency and more transactions per second.
  1. Jaw-dropping
At the end of November 2017, Bitcoin's value reached toward $10,000 per unit. There are some 16.7 million Bitcoin units in circulation, and the cryptocurrency's market capitalization ($167,156,585,840 as of Nov. 28, 2017) is actually higher than that of Disney, McDonald's or IBM, and it is slightly above that of GE.
  1. Publicly traded
As of early December, there is another way to invest in Bitcoin without possessing some of the digital currency. On Dec. 10, 2017, Bitcoin futures -- "financial contracts obligating the buyer to purchase an asset or the seller to sell an asset," according to Investopedia -- became available on Cboe, a Chicago exchange. What this means for the future of Bitcoin is uncertain, but some argue it will help stabilize the cryptocurrency's wild price fluctuations.
submitted by Itob_io to u/Itob_io [link] [comments]

So, I'm putting together a project on the sustainability of Bitcoin, I may need to some help...

First of all, I should point out that by no means am I an expert on Bitcoin or even anything close to that. I consider myself to have a decent enough knowledge of it, probably just under or equal to the average level of this subreddit.
So yeah, I'm putting together a 3000-5000 word essay on the sustainability of Bitcoin and whether it can further implemented into online trade in the future.
A few quick topics/talking points I've got for each one: Bitcoin is sustainable: 1. Lack of central bank. 2. Can't track Bitcoins (user remains anonymous, e.g. Silk Road etc). 3. Huge community base compares to previous crypto-currencies. 4. Large companies starting to accept payments in Bitcoin for products/services. 5. Influence of well-known people such as the Winklevoss twins.
Bitcoin isn't sustainable: 1. Mining problems 2. Hackevirus attacks (e.g. Mt. Gox situation). 3. Perhaps some overreaction by some speculators due to increase in publicity. 4. Reference to previous crypto-currencies and why they failed. 5. Banks (e.g. Wells Fargo) closing some accounts which show activity with CoinBase. 6. Some governments are looking to begin regulation of Bitcoin (or have already regulated it), defeating some of the purposes it was created for in the first place.
Can it be further implemented into online trade? Yes: 1. No central bank = decentralised (therefore can't be taxed by a bank). 2. Already started to be accepted by some firms, meaning that an initial implementation has already occurred, making further growth slightly easier. 3. Some music artists (such as 50 Cent) already expressing interest into accepting Bitcoin for their music.
No: 1. Can be very volatile at times, therefore some firms don't want to take the risk associated with accepting Bitcoin. 2. Some large companies fear hacking attacks could drain their Bitcoin wallets.
As you can see, I haven't really dived into too many complex topics. I would appreciate if some of you with a much more advanced understanding of Bitcoin could perhaps give me some advice on certain directions I should go in or some talking points I should add.
Apologies for the long post...
TL;DR: Doing an essay on Bitcoin's sustainability, need some advice on topics I should add etc.
submitted by dnim7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin: A BIT of a problem

My name is Joe Average. I am the 80% of people who found out about bitcoin. I found out last week that an ATM for a new type of special currency is being released in my hometown, Vancouver BC Canada. Like many others, I'm still clueless about bitcoin, despite spending my halloween weekend researching it, trying to find out whether it's a trick or a treat (sorry I had to).
In this post, I'll list what I know about it, then list the thoughts, problems, and barriers that I, and probably 80% of the population, feel about bitcoin. These things are probably most relevant to those of you bitcoin enthusiast that have a vested interest in the success of the currency/commodity, because the general public represents a population that will influence the capacity that bitcoin can have in society.
Bitcoin has many advantages. Here are the advantages that I came across in forums and news articles: -free from government influence -zero bank fees -limited resource, naturally appreciating value -relatively anonymous -intangible, convenient to carry -irreversible transactions
And here are some problems, starting from the most relevant one which probably everyone thinks of right off the bat:
1-Bitcoin or cash? Why should I bother using bitcoin? Dozens of local merchants in my area are accepting bitcoin. Wow that's great! Now I can spend 2 hours acquiring bitcoin from a private, ungoverned, unregulated exchange (more on that later) and buy a medium belgium hot chocolate from waves (great drink by the way). Paying with card or cash? No ma'am, I'm paying with BITCOIN big teethy smile, eyebrows up and down several times Ok, bust out the ipad or whatever, spend 15 minutes waiting for the cashier to grab her ipad, unlock the screen, get a network connection at coffee shop network speeds, tap the bitpay app or w/e, load the app, scan my qr code, wait for the transaction to verify, blah blah blah, meanwhile, big ass line up forms behind me and I'm the big asshole who decided to pay with bitcoin instead of cash.
Okay, in all fairness, I'm probably being ignorant to some bitcoin app out there that cuts this whole process down from 15 minutes to just 5 minutes, the time it takes to verify transactions. But if I have to use an app, that probably costs money. So now my $4.50 dark belgium hot chocolate now costs $4.65 + 5 minutes of my life.
Hmm maybe I'll just 1) whip out some cash 2) whip out my visa card and pay it off right away so I don't incur interest fees 3) pay for it with debit, my bank doesn't charge me debit fees for using my card
2-Sending bitcoin So let's say what appeals to me is that bitcoin replaces Western Union, bank transfers, etcetc. I want to send $4,000 to Alice and Bob of ABC Co., payment for their work as hypothetical people in every accounting example I've ever read. For that amount, I'd have to pay >$100 in service fees from a money company. Or I could save myself >$100 by using bitcoin instead.
Okay great! Where do I start? Download a wallet. Done, nice. Next step, synchonize 208 weeks of ledger. Great.. oh, hang on. It's been 4 hours and I've downloaded 3 weeks. What the fuck?! How long does this take.. it doesn't even tell me how long it will take or how big the file is! computer left running overnight Awesome, just 2 more nights to go then I'll be fully syncrhonized. 2 days later hard-drive is maxed out? I needed a new one anyways. 4 days and a 500GB SSD later Now I have my wallet ready to use. Time to purchase some bitcoin!
So I purchase bitcoin, send it to Bob and Alice, and since they own ABC Co., a massive enterprise, they employ an IT guy, and he is the only guy in the company who will ever understand how to securely use bitcoin. He's behind 2 juniper firewalls (for redundancy), we VPN tunnel'd the payment code over with the pass, that way I know it went to him and nothing's been compromised. Because once the funds are sent out, it's gone, there is no insurance. Which brings me to my next point:
Bottom line: requires a lot of time to SAFELY and SECURELY send bitcoin, FEE-FREE. But that's okay because I have nothing better to do. If I had kids, errands, work, non-IT hobbies to do, $40-$100 might be worth the time it takes me to research the process of sending bitcoin out properly.
3-Bitcoin wallet services There's a whole list of companies emerging to take podium position in the race of the bitcoin wallet services world. Besides setting up a bitcoin exchange (which anyone can do in their basement), bitcoin wallets are the next biggest thing in bitcoin.
In the digital world, about 3 companies take podium position in a certain thing. Like Android/Apple/Blackberry for cell phones, Windows/Apple/Linux, Chrome/Firefox/IE, etc etc. Right now, for digital bitcoin wallets, everyone's competing to be one of those 3 major companies that everyone will use. Companies like coinbase.
These companies cost money. Coinbase has a pretty impressive talent pool. Let me introduce them to you:
Barry Kwok- Holy shit, this guy has a Masters in Engineering?! No seriously, this guy is a master of engineering. He built teams of 5 to 50 people at Google (fucking google man!). This guy is the first guy on the list, how much does he make? I'd have to guess $120k
Craig Hammell- This guy built OK Cupid. I know a guy who uses that shit to get laid, it really works, so OK cupid is probably a well-established company. Because of Craig's success with OK cupid, and the fact he looks that young, I'd say he probably doesn't make that much, just a modest $90k
Olaf Carlson-Wee- Olaf does rock-climbing, enough said. $95k
Fred Erhsam- Traded at Goldman Sachs. $150k
Charlie Lee- Invented Litecoin, worked on google chrome, google play, and youtube. $120k
Brian Armstrong- This guy has experience with Fraud Prevention. Don't know why they hired him, because as everyone's been saying, you can't fraud bitcoin. Since they don't need him, he's probably an intern.
Let's run some quick numbers: Total cost of salaries: $575,000/year Other expenses including dividends to investors: $3m/year
So this company has $3.6m a year to allocate to their consumer base of 329k of wallets, and 12k merchants. That is roughly $10.56/year per wallet or merchant. (realistically, the portion of cost between wallets and merchants would be not be split equally, and of course all these figures are pulled straight from thin air, however, this is reddit, not forbes).
That is a very low amount compared to using VISA which costs merchants $0.25/transaction+monthly service fee. As we can see, bitcoin is a great! Save some money.
But here's the problem: people fraud banks all the time. That costs money. Somebody puts $10k in their digital wallet, loses it, they're going to be pissed off. They'll start demanding it back from coinbase. The day coinbase pays 1 guy $10k compensation, the day they'll have to pay everyone that loses money like that, and that $3-mil figure I gave above will be much higher, and the fees everyone has to pay will go up. If coinbase doesn't compensate, then people will be reluctant to use bitcoin for anything other than small transactions.
This means bitcoin will not have the capacity to be adopted by regular people, like me. Either I lose big chunks of money at a time, when my digital wallet gets hacked, goes missing, frauded, etc, or I lose it in smaller chunks and frequency which is similar to a bank.
So digital wallet services are just like banks. Wait, I thought the bitcoin guys were saying banks were a bad thing?
4-Inflation vs Deflation I see a lot of bitcoin enthusiasts talking economics, which really angers me. You should read some of the things they say "inflation is bad, bitcoin actually deflates, so its good" "the government can't fuck with bitcoin, so its good" "bitcoin good, so it's good". If you're a bitcoin enthusiast and discussed bitcoin economics, you probably need to trade your internet credit for some college credits. Because seriously, that is some retarded shit. For example:
Inflation is bad, bitcoin deflates = good / The gov't can't fuck with bitcoin so it's good No. Inflation is good, yes I said it and you can quote me on that. Inflation allows job creation through lowering interest rates which encourages people and businesses to buy things. When stuff is bought, things happen. And jobs are required to make things happen. So when the government sees that "hey, our economy ain't doin too well, how bout we print some of ye ol' fashioned paper dolla bills" that's a strategic move to lower the unemployment rate and increase GDP.
The US is in shambles right now for reasons beyond inflation. The #1 reason why is labour costs too much in the US. Shaquila and Billy Bob don't want to work in a factory for $12/hr, they're too in love with hollywood and liberty, thinking they're entitled to a high paying comfortable job. Half of America thinks like that. But guess what, the Chinese don't, they're happy to pick up where Shaquila and Billy Bob left off. And because of the economies of scale thanks to their large population, that ignited over night, and now the US is left with a population that doesn't want to work. There's also a bunch of other reasons like going to war, etc, but that's debatable because there's a cost/benefit of going to war (own all the oil rigs out east to pay for things because you lazy fucks can't be bothered to make money with elbow grease).
The point is, mind fuck #1, inflation is a solution to a problem that's not related to money.
On the other side of the coin, deflation IS a bad thing.
Deflation, which bitcoin is designed to do, means that there will be fewer amounts of money to spend over time. That increases the price of things. That's good for people who are holding on to bitcoin. This encourages people to spend with bitcoin less, and save more. Mind fuck #2, saving money is bad, because it reduces GDP. It reduces the need for companies like coinbase to develop and create a product for spending bitcoin in the first place. So the more bitcoin deflates, the more its value goes up, the less people spend bitcoin on shit, the less merchants see a point in accepting bitcoin, the less merchants use bitcoin, the less people buy bitcoin, then bitcoins value goes down.
5-Limited supply of bitcoins This title should read Diminishing supply of bitcoins, but it would then be misinterpreted without an explanation. Bitcoins don't diminish, they are simply unaccounted for. Meaning, if you have bitcoins, and forget the password, it is gone forever. And in case you didn't know, people are human, making them prone to mistakes. Forgetting, etc. So, over time, enough people will lose bits and pieces of bitcoin here and there. That's going to add up over the long run. Units of measure will start going to miliBits, Microbits, ultra micro bits, ultra ultra micro bits. etc. Kind of like fiat currency, it can inflate to be infinitely large, and with bitcoin, infinitely smaller.
6-Exchanges and trading When Silk Road went down, bitcoin went up. First, naturally and by way of economics, fewer bitcoin = increased value. The Silk Road guy had $26-million USD worth of bitcoin, more than enough bitcoin to raise the market price. Followed by that, we have news, and hype, which drove higher. Then the fact prices are going up, makes a nice news article, which drives it up even more. When prices went up because of the news, incentive went up. Now the prices are so high, some people have made fortunes off of it. And that makes the news too, which drives it up again even higher.
That's a great incentive if you're a bitcoin investor. Hey, the winklevoss twins have 1% of bitcoin, all you miners go use your mining pools to break into the winklevoss account and delete the fuck out of their bitcoin wallets and backup, so you can raise the market value.
Just kidding. That's a lot of work. You know what's easier? This:
1) Start your own bitcoin exchange, no fees 100% free. 2) People will start trading on it. 3) ???? 4) Profit!
Actually step 3 isn't a mystery, you set the fucking price level to whatever you want it to be. And because it's 100% unregulated, unsanctioned, not tied to any commodities, no authority, no referee, no consortium, you can do whatever the fuck you want on it.
Without authority, believing that the prices on the bitcoin exchange is set naturally by way of price and demand is like believing in religion. You just have to believe.
Of course with public exchanges, there is some level of corruption involved, but that's why people get arrested and shit. Using bitcoin exchanges doesn't have that level of protection, and it never will. You think the governments own law enforcement is going to go after guys corrupting a private stock exchange, which trades a currency that negatively impacts their own fiat currency? Unless the government is somehow benefiting from bitcoin, which it won't by design, the police will simply have a good laugh at that.
In conclusion, there's so many flaws that I can see with bitcoin. But bitcoin enthusiasts will say otherwise. If I jumped on the bitcoin train 3 years ago, I'd probably do the same thing as you: make up some backwards economic reasoning it'll succeed, some backward political reason, etc.
So Dear Bitcoin, you just don't make enough sense to us, the general population, for us to adopt you. A great substitute for currency in the underground world, but you just don't fit with us here on the mainstream. And if you did fit, you'll end up being regulated just like currency, so what's the point? You're the same shit as my cash or cards. Fuck off. -Joe Average
submitted by smoothboi69 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: bitcoin top posts from 2016-11-05 to 2016-12-04 23:10 PDT

Period: 29.72 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 39770
Rate (per day) 33.65 1317.40
Unique Redditors 635 5193
Combined Score 79721 141041

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 4004 points, 1 submission: btg643
    1. Excuse me? (4004 points, 293 comments)
  2. 2344 points, 1 submission: AndreAbdel27
    1. What 30$ looks in Venezuela's Currency. (2344 points, 310 comments)
  3. 2000 points, 1 submission: sk221
    1. California just legalized marijuana - a $22 billlion industry can't open a bank account. Bitcoin, here's your chance! (2000 points, 202 comments)
  4. 1378 points, 14 submissions: eragmus
    1. Peter Thiel (member of President-Elect Trump's Transition Team): "It becomes a threat to fiat money at a point where Bitcoin is encrypted in such a robust way that the tax authorities can't break the encryption, can't tell how much money you have, and what transactions you are doing." [x-post] (498 points, 152 comments)
    2. Henry Brade: "Based on new transaction stats SegWit will more than double the #bitcoin tx capacity. And it enables secure LN for real scaling. We need it!" (275 points, 162 comments)
    3. Alex B.: "Back before the block size limit debate was even relevant, @gwern hit the nail on the head. Features are secondary, resilience sine qua non." ['Bitcoin’s greatest virtue is not its deflation, nor its microtransactions, but its viral distributed nature; it can wait for its opportunity.'] (155 points, 135 comments)
    4. An ELI5 on small vs. big blocks, and the importance of node decentralization. (67 points, 105 comments)
    5. SF Bitcoin Devs - Blockstream's Andrew Poelstra discusses MimbleWimble ["Is a blockchain design w/ no script support & blinded amounts. Like proverbial black holes, tx outputs have no hair. This simplicity allows aggressive compaction & aggregation, resulting in much better scalability."] (64 points, 11 comments)
    6. Avtar Sehra (CEO and Product Architect at Nivaura): "Nivaura has been approved by UK regulator to commercially test debt structuring, issuance, and [life cycle management of decentralised debt instruments] settlement on Bitcoin" (50 points, 5 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Core - IRC Meeting Summary (November 10, 2016) (48 points, 8 comments)
    8. The Status of the ‘Hong Kong Hard Fork’: An Update (46 points, 19 comments)
    9. Bitcoin Core - IRC Meeting Summary (November 17, 2016) (39 points, 2 comments)
    10. Bitcoin Core - IRC Meeting Summary (November 3, 2016) (36 points, 0 comments)
  5. 1167 points, 6 submissions: Coinosphere
    1. Marijuana now legal in eight more US States while vendors get more bitcoin options (698 points, 54 comments)
    2. Cell 411 launches decentralized ride sharing in Austin accepting Bitcoin (106 points, 24 comments)
    3. Hacker holds San Francisco railway to ransom, demands 100 bitcoins (98 points, 21 comments)
    4. IRS agrees to major cryptocurrency strategy overhaul following audit (96 points, 22 comments)
    5. Blockchain (most popular) wallet adding an instant bitcoin buying option for credit and debit cards (86 points, 15 comments)
    6. The oldest bitcoin exchange, BTCC, moves into the US market (83 points, 11 comments)
  6. 1085 points, 2 submissions: The_Arctic_Wolf
    1. Block #440,000 was just mined. There are 16 million bitcoin now. (1025 points, 132 comments)
    2. Turmeric launch, Rootstock's Testnet (video) (60 points, 18 comments)
  7. 952 points, 4 submissions: Onetallnerd
    1. Lawyers say they've found signs of a third rogue cop tied to the Silk Road case (768 points, 114 comments)
    2. Segwit Signaling. [Note that those signaling now will not affect consensus until the start of the next difficulty retarget] (75 points, 34 comments)
    3. The Bitcoin Lightning Spec Part 1/8 (63 points, 10 comments)
    4. [bitcoin-dev] Forcenet: an experimental network with a new header format (46 points, 19 comments)
  8. 844 points, 18 submissions: quadrilliondollars
    1. One of the four biggest accounting firms in the world adopts bitcoin! (169 points, 16 comments)
    2. Good news for Bitcoin: Iceland's Pirate party invited to form government. Anti-establishment group receives mandate for power-sharing pact after talks to build five-party coalition fail. (71 points, 5 comments)
    3. India just hard-forked the rupee. (70 points, 15 comments)
    4. Venezuela's currency now worth so little shopkeepers weigh vast piles of notes instead of counting them (68 points, 15 comments)
    5. Gold above 500 gm owned by married women can be seized: Fin Min (India). (66 points, 25 comments)
    6. Andreas Antonopoulos on London Real! (61 points, 15 comments)
    7. Please make your voice heard here. We can request bitcoin support from the next President. (58 points, 22 comments)
    8. IMF approves $12 billion bailout for Egypt after austerity measures including lifting currency controls last week which made the Egyptian pound drop by almost 50 percent against the dollar (43 points, 5 comments)
    9. The War On Cash Goes Nuclear In India, Australia and Across The World (36 points, 7 comments)
    10. (AA) Exponential Innovation - Hackers Congress (33 points, 2 comments)
  9. 831 points, 9 submissions: _smudger_
    1. WOW! China's Huiyin Group Launches $20 Million Bitcoin Fund (274 points, 32 comments)
    2. Winklevoss twins see bitcoin as better than gold. Brothers hope to launch ETF soon (227 points, 80 comments)
    3. India: ZebPay adding 25000 bitcoins customers per month !!! - reports enquiries up 20 to 30% in the past couple of days (108 points, 30 comments)
    4. Another record volume for LocalBitcoins including regional records in Europe,Pakistan,Russia,Saudi Arabia,USA and Venezuela (70 points, 11 comments)
    5. R3 blockchain opens to all (51 points, 59 comments)
    6. Liberland, Bitcoin Utopia: The man who created a tiny country he can no longer enter - BBC News (34 points, 25 comments)
    7. Go India!!! (31 points, 5 comments)
    8. Get voting! (19 points, 2 comments)
    9. China Imposes New Capital Controls; Bitcoin Price Optimistic (17 points, 20 comments)
  10. 819 points, 3 submissions: jmw74
    1. Coinbase pledges to fight IRS request in court (727 points, 242 comments)
    2. IRS requesting info from Coinbase on users transacting 2013-2015 (68 points, 57 comments)
    3. Hasn't segwit activation already failed for this difficulty period? (24 points, 37 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. nullc (3550 points, 273 comments)
  2. luke-jr (1988 points, 276 comments)
  3. Frogolocalypse (1668 points, 555 comments)
  4. bitusher (1587 points, 270 comments)
  5. BashCo (1127 points, 194 comments)
  6. dellintelbitcoin (1039 points, 274 comments)
  7. belcher_ (976 points, 189 comments)
  8. jcoinner (880 points, 208 comments)
  9. manginahunter (853 points, 307 comments)
  10. smartfbrankings (788 points, 184 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Excuse me? by btg643 (4004 points, 293 comments)
  2. What 30$ looks in Venezuela's Currency. by AndreAbdel27 (2344 points, 310 comments)
  3. California just legalized marijuana - a $22 billlion industry can't open a bank account. Bitcoin, here's your chance! by sk221 (2000 points, 202 comments)
  4. Block #440,000 was just mined. There are 16 million bitcoin now. by The_Arctic_Wolf (1025 points, 132 comments)
  5. "If Trump Wins, here's what I'll do..." User Coincle pledges to give away 25.47 bitcoin to those who commented on his post if Donald J. Trump is elected president. So, where's my bitcoin? by ILikeGreenit (806 points, 355 comments)
  6. Banking in India Right Now by surge3d (801 points, 198 comments)
  7. $12 B worth of the world's currency is uncontrolled and independent from the governments of the world. by ztsmart (795 points, 135 comments)
  8. Lawyers say they've found signs of a third rogue cop tied to the Silk Road case by Onetallnerd (768 points, 114 comments)
  9. Monthly reminder for newbies: The Bitcoins you store on an exchange ARE NOT YOUR BITCOINS - they are an IOU. If you hold a decent amount of bitcoins, please make the intelligent decision NOW to transfer your coins to a secure mobile or hardware wallet that you control. by GabeNewell_ (759 points, 237 comments)
  10. Coinbase pledges to fight IRS request in court by jmw74 (727 points, 242 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 534 points: EgoTrps's comment in "If Trump Wins, here's what I'll do..." User Coincle pledges to give away 25.47 bitcoin to those who commented on his post if Donald J. Trump is elected president. So, where's my bitcoin?
  2. 334 points: SuperPuffin's comment in BREAKING: Trump advisers considering $JPM CEO Dimon for Treasury post
  3. 292 points: AndreAbdel27's comment in What 30$ looks in Venezuela's Currency.
  4. 262 points: Myrmec's comment in Excuse me?
  5. 247 points: jtoomim's comment in Core is the new big blocker. 3.7Mb mined on testnet with segwit.
  6. 216 points: paperraincoat's comment in Excuse me?
  7. 190 points: brokenskill's comment in "If Trump Wins, here's what I'll do..." User Coincle pledges to give away 25.47 bitcoin to those who commented on his post if Donald J. Trump is elected president. So, where's my bitcoin?
  8. 181 points: amnesiac-eightyfour's comment in Banking in India Right Now
  9. 173 points: deleted's comment in Peter Thiel (member of President-Elect Trump's Transition Team): "It becomes a threat to fiat money at a point where Bitcoin is encrypted in such a robust way that the tax authorities can't break the encryption, can't tell how much money you have, and what transactions you are doing." [x-post]
  10. 171 points: butters1337's comment in BREAKING: Trump advisers considering $JPM CEO Dimon for Treasury post
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New Age Media Management now accepting Bitcoin

Now Accepting Bitcoin
New Age Media Management, a New York City-based management firm, is betting on Bitcoin, and plans to accept the crypto-currency beginning March 14.
Though some might question the move given Bitcoin's current spate of bad press, New Age founder Adam Lopez has no qualms about taking the crypto-currency, which is unregulated, has no central bank and has fluctuated wildly since the first Bitcoins were issued about five years ago.
"It's breaking into a lot of merchant circles very quickly and we wanted to be the first in the entertainment space to accept it," Lopez told Pollstar. "No one has really come forward saying they'll accept this for everything from artist commissions to consultation payments to anything we deal with across the board.
"We pride ourselves on being very tech forward. This is something our team has been researching for eight months to a year - watching prices, the stock as it rises and falls, and we felt like right now, despite it getting a little bad press recently, was the right time to make it public."
The bad press stems from news that one of the most prominent exchanges for Bitcoin trading - the Japan-based Mt. Gox - announced it was filing for bankruptcy last month after about 850,000 Bitcoins valued at more than $400 million disappeared from its digital coffers.
In a news conference, Mt. Gox CEO Mark Karpelès explained the exchange had been hacked, and "there was some weakness in the system, and the Bitcoins have disappeared. I apologize for causing trouble," he said, according to the Wall Street Journal.
Another Bitcoin bank, Flexcoin, called it quits March 2, announcing on its site, "Flexcoin was attacked and robbed of all coins in the hot wallet. The attacker made off with 896 BTC. . As Flexcoin does not have the resources, assets, or otherwise to come back from this loss, we are closing our doors immediately." Elsewhere, Autumn Radtke, the CEO for virtual currency exchange First Meta, was found dead in her Singapore home in what's been reported as an apparent suicide.
Bitcoin has taken hits previously. After the FBI shut down online black-market site Silk Road in October 2013, seizing 144,000 Bitcoins, the value of the crypto-currency plummeted.
It has since recovered and many have called for increased regulations, which Lopez thinks could eventually help legitimize the virtual currency. But it's also going to take buy-in from huge e-commerce companies such as the Amazons of the world before Bitcoin might gain wide acceptance.
New Age Media Management's interest was piqued through the entertainment investment space and its dealings with venture capitalists.
"You have the Winklevoss twins, people like Fred Wilson, and Google ventures who have all invested $30 or $35 million apiece into this venture," Lopez said, adding it's important to separate the currency from the technology as they're investing in "the technology of it. That's really where the money is - investing in the technology of this being accepted and getting merchants on board."
Overstock.com is one such merchant. The company announced in January it would accept the virtual currency and said March 4 it expects Bitcoin sales to reach $10 million or $15 million this year, up from the $5 million it had expected, the WSJ reported.
Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic has also backed Bitcoin for its commercial space flights. The Winklevoss twins, coincidentally, announced March 5 they'd booked their Virgin Galactic flights using the crypto-currency.
Aside from the potential investment aspects of Bitcoin, Lopez noted his company could save thousands on fees by accepting the virtual currency.
"The transaction fees are incredibly lower," he said. "Sometimes you'll have a 3 or 4 percent transaction fee if you go through somebody like PayPal or a credit card where as with Bitcoin you're looking at something like half a percent. That makes all the difference when you're doing transactions in the tens of thousands of dollars and saves you that much more money."
It's an idea that makes sense, and just one reason Lopez is so confident about accepting the crypto-currency.
"Bitcoin is definitely in the infancy stages so it's going to fluctuate a lot in price and in interest but we feel like a lot of our artists and the VCs we work with are very excited about the concept," he said.
-Dana Parker-McClain
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[Table] IAmA: Hey, Alex Winter of Bill & Ted here. Directing a new movie called "Deep Web: The Untold Story of Bitcoin and Silk Road." Ask me anything!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2013-11-25
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
As someone who creates content, do you think there's a solution for middle class content creators? It seems that they're the most hurt by piracy, yet free-culture proponents almost exclusively focus on large corporations. Kickstarter, Indie Go-Go, and their brethren aren't picking up that slack- tales of success seem to be the outliers, and many of the poster-children (Radiohead, Amanda Palmer, etc.) rely on past success and marketing dollars. So, will this pick up, and will there be a middle class of creators? Or are we now living in a world of (sometimes skilled, but still) amateurs? This is a smart question and demands a much longer answer than i can give here. but the short of it in my opinion is that it's a misunderstanding to assume it's harder for 'middle class artists' in this climate. it's always been very very hard. there have always been obstacles and gatekeepers. the digital landscape has opened many many doors and closed some doors. it's in many ways easier, but you still need that magic combo of talent, tenacity and luck.
Man I'm sorry but I've gotta ask...what happened to you man? Why did Keanu make it out and why did you disappear into obscurity? Haha. not an offensive question at all. I quit acting professionally in 94, after Freaked to focus on writing and directing. I'd been acting professionally since I was 10 years old and I wanted out of the public eye. It's really only been in the last couple of years that i've intentionally been slipping back in front of the camera. But I think it's important for child actors to spend time away from constant exposure. I tell a lot of kids this in that field.
Be honest…has Keanu admitted his immortality to you? I could tell you but then I'd have to kill you. And then he would drink your blood and live for another millenia...
Did you buy any Bitcoins before they blew up in value recently? Haha, I did not. The Winklevoss twins got them all :)
Since George Carlin has died, will there be some new character coming in to replace Rufus in helping the Wyld Stallyns? We've spent a lot of time and thought on making this work. all i can say right now :)
On a scale of 1 to 10, how likely is it that B&T 3 will be financed and actually get made? I'd say 10 but it's Hollywood... so 9.9?
Did you ever use the SR before it went down? I honestly did not. I am a dull family man and most of what i need to purchase online can be found in the toddler section of Amazon :)
Your stepmom is cute. Remember when she was a senior and you were a freshman? Do You get BnT references constantly and do they annoy you? No, thankfully I like the movies a lot. I have some friends who acted in movies that they can't shake that they hated. that is an existential nightmare from which one can never awaken!
Thanks for doing this AMA, and for being part of one of my all-time favorite films. You've been quoted as saying "[Bill and Ted] was a happy accident. No one thought it would ever see the light of day." Could you expand on that? Both BnT movies were made independently. The first one was really low budget and kind of under the radar when we made it. then it sat on a shelf for a year after being made, when the producing company went belly up. So we kind of gave up on it. Then it was bought up and released and was a big hit :)
What was it like working with Mr. T? Is his public persona accurate as to who he really is? It is! Exactly! He's a really great person, into community outreach and helping people. A wonderful guy.
When will we have a new Bill and Ted to watch any plot details You can share? What got You so interested in Bitcoin? Also, Thank You for being so Excellent! Party On! I first got interested in Bitcoin in '09, when it magically appeared out of the ether. Much like Napster appeared out of nowhere 10 years prior. I recognized that Bitcoin felt like the next big thing to come out of peer-to-peer.
What can I do to get into the Bitcoin World. I don't know much about it. Start at blockchain.info. that will lead the way.
Do you think the Tor network is forever tainted due to the Silk Road takedown, or does it still remain a viable method of obtaining true anonymity on the Internet? Absolutely not. SR accounts for a tiny fraction of TOR use and is not going to impact Bitcoin much either in the long run. As Wozniak so perfectly put it, you don't shut down the whole highway when one car is speeding.
What was the funnest thing about making The Lost Boys? Having dirt kicked into my eyes by the two Coreys in my death scene. Actually it wasn't funny at the time; i had full eye contacts in and my cornea got scratched. had to go the hospital. Loved those guys tho...
Any cool memorabilia you kept from Bill and Ted? I had my evil robot head from BnT 2, but it eventually rotted. I used it as a doorstep. My kids loved it :)
What motivated you to be one of the first films to educate those about the online blackmarket? why exactly do you need the funding from the kickstarter? Because, like the Napster story, there is a lot of noise but not a lot of context. I think we need some context and our film will be one form of providing that. We are using Kickstarter for some of the funding in order to begin to build our community for the film. We want people's input, the changes occurring through the Web are part of a global movement.
Are you actually going to provide any information we don't already know from all that's been written about this? Is this just a movie version of a bunch of news articles? Our doc is an expansive examination of a movement that began decades ago and is now hitting a peak of global impact. we are interviewing the core players in this story. It's not the kind of thing news articles do in any capacity. join our kickstarter, be part of the process and of the movie's community :)
How did you do research for the script? How did you get a script just a few weeks after SR was busted? It's a documentary :)
Alex, as someone who studied Napster so much for Downloaded, what would Bill & Ted have thought of it: Most Excellent or Non-Triumphant? They would have said 'huh???'
Is a melvin a synonym for wedgie, or a completely different maneuver executed from the front? You answered your own question :))
Is there any fond memory that stands out from making The Lost Boys? Honestly the most fun i ever had 'working'. Joel Schumacher knows how to create an amazing environment to work in. It's one of my fondest memories of my crazy youth! :)
On the kickstarter page, under the "Silk Road" header, the phrase "trading mostly in drugs and weapons" is used. Don't you feel that claiming that weapon sales were a large part of the silk road's operations is misleading? especially since weapon sales were specifically banned from the site shortly after its creation? Certainly the part about mostly trading in drugs is spot on, but also weapons? Come on, that's just untrue. Sorry if that seems misleading. As the Armory only lasted a year. But SR was built for that purpose wherever it ultimately landed.
I don't know if you remember me, but I went to school with your son in LA, me and my brother stayed at your house a few times. Kinda funny how I never got to thank you for being so excellent in Bill and Ted back then, so I figured I'd do it now! Hey Dante! Hope you guys are well!
I suppose I should ask a question, so what drew you to the idea of the deep web? What made you want to make this movie? The Deep Web lies at the heart of the digital revolution, that has impacted every corner of our lives. There are huge changes that have occurred in the last decade, and many more around the corner. Examining the Deep Web in detail allows us to closely examine this revolution and its implications.
Do you think that the high prices that bitcoins are experiencing right now is actually a bad sign, since it indicates instability? Where do you think the value of Bitcoins will ultimately fall once the bubble bursts? No one knows where it will settle. It's not unlike gold in this regard. But once it's been around a bit longer and more people are taking it, the value will increase within that framework but not in such a wild manner. this form of currency is here to stay, of that there is no question.
How did people find silk road online? That always boggled my mind, because I assume it wasn't as easy as googling it haha Did you have to like, "know" someone in the business to gain membership? It's not hard to find these sites, it's just dangerous. don't go hunting for scorpions unless you are prepared to get stung.
So Deep Web... Do you have a script already? Are you dealing with the actual events, or fictionalizing them? If the former, are you worried about having to pay folks for rights? If you have a script, how does it toe the line between being too simplified to please the target demo/actually tell the story and too esoteric for the mass market? It's a feature documentary. please join our kickstarter :)
I don't think the story is too esoteric at all, just as the details of the Napster story weren't. These are universal stories about global communities.
How much about the deep web did you investigate? I have done some looking into it recently and there is some pretty disgusting stuff out there. To be honest I kind of wish I never heard about it. Silk road is only the tip of the iceberg and to me doesnt seem like that big of a deal compared to some of the other stuff out there like the hitmen websites and human dolls for sale etc. What is your take on the rest of it outside of silk road? There is a lot of dark and horrible stuff in the Dark Web. The Deep Web is a much broader world, and in my view needs to be understood as separate from the much smaller Dark Web, and in need of protection.
When did you get into directing? I realize I could easily find this out on IMDB but it's just cooler to ask the source! Hah, thanks for asking! I actually went to NYU film school to study directing before I acted in all the movies. It's always been one of my passions. I started directing professionally in about 86. Shooting music videos and commercials and then our show on MTV, The Idiot Box.
So I'm guessing MTV/Viacom or somesuch own the DVD rights to The Idiot Box? There was a fair amount of comedy from that era of MTV that I'd love to be able to watch again… MTV owns it... why no DVD... yet...
What was it like working with a big star like Larry "bud" Melman? He was awesome of course. RIP.
Wait, does Satoshi = Stations??? Ahhh you cracked the code!!!
Excellent job on Downloaded! I enjoyed remembering a time in the not so distant past when 'regular people' could not envision a world in which their music lived on a computer. Today, regular people cannot envision a world in which their money lives on a computer. I was also surprised to learn about your early connection with the world of MP3s. Could you elaborate on what you think we can learn about Bitcoin based on your experiences with Napster and the MP3 scene in the late 90's? The world is responding to Bitcoin and a new awareness of the Deep Web much like they responded to Napster, with fear and demonizing. Our film aims to put these things in some context.
What made you want to do this documentary? I've been following the story myself and it's certainly one worth following but how did you yourself first get interested in the topic? I have been interested in global web-based communities and emerging technologies since the mid 80's. There is a revolution occurring in global culture at the moment, that will change everything. and it's only just beginning. what's not interesting about that?? :)
I don't have a question but Excellent Adventure made me who I am today. Thank you. Fuck it, uh. Do you agree that Cinnamon Toast Crunch is hands down the best cereal? My kids do. it's evil.
off, I want to thank you for posting my Rasta Eyeball with a machine gun tattoo on your blog. It made getting it completely worth it. I just want to know which of the characters from Freaked is your favourite? Stuey Gluck!!
And your tat is amazing!
Hello there, thanks for doing this! I just wanted to ask if by making a movie that sheds light on the dark web/bitcoins etc. It will shed more light on an area of the web that generally dislikes the attention. In other words could it create a misaprehension of the mission and possible positive effects the darkweb community tries to provide? I think the current media spin has that effect; in that it tends to paint the entire deep web and bitcoins and cryptography with a negative brush. this is both inaccurate and destructive. Our movie does not paint dark things in a positive light, it gives context to the entire arena.
Will the Silk Road be back? Also, can you say hi to my smokin hot babe Sherry? It is back.
Hey Alex, A quick glance at your wikipedia page has made me realise you directed Knock Me Down by RHCP! Did you have much contact with the band? How was it working with them? Thanks for the AMA; Looking forward to B&T3! I love the chili's and have known them for decades. they are still great, but in the mid 80's when I had the fortune of doing some work with them, it is hard to quantify how amazing they were. the best live act on the road, by far!!
So when are you planning to bless the world with Bill & Ted 3? Soon as we get it up and running!
If you could star in any movie from any time, what movie would it be and what role would you have and why? Buster Keaton in anything probably. No one in the movies ever had a better time.
So what is the "untold" story of Bitcoin/Silk road? Isn't most of it public knowledge by now? Or we'll we have to wait and see the movie? You don't have to wait if you join our Kickstarter and become part of the making of the movie! It is hardly public knowledge as no one has framed this story up yet in one film, and the story itself is unfolding every day. :)
What was the most surprising thing you found out about the Silk Road? That's in the movie :)
Hey Alex, What will Deep Web be like? Sort of a CNN special or does it have a bigger ambition, i.e. are you making it on a scale for wide distribution in movie theaters? If the latter, what documentaries would you compare it to in terms of style and storytelling? Our doc has a broader ambition than reportage. We are making a film about a technological revolution that has been brewing for decades.
Hm, don't know you but this does sound interesting. When can we expect this movie to come out? Anything interesting about these topics you learned? Every day I learn something new and fascinating. We hope to finish within the next year. Join our kickstarter and be part of our community :)
What ''good'' is there in the deep web? I only hear stories about horrific things like drugs, black market stuff, assassins, etc. Also, were you fortunate enough to had invested in bitcoin in it's early stages? The Deep Web is being demonized somewhat in the press, which is a misunderstanding of what it is. DW represents all content on the web that is not indexed. this doesn't mean people are doing bad things. it means they are unseen. the Dark Web is a term that has come to characterize people who use the web for illicit means. the dark web represents a fraction of the Deep Web.
On your Kickstarter campaign, you say, "Bitcoin has the potential to create a level of global disruption that will make Napster look like child's play." Can you expand on that? BitCoin is a peer to peer crypto-currency. Like any peer to peer technology it is decentralized and operated by a wide user base spread across the net. As such it is here to stay, and being an unregulated currency that exists outside the control of banks and governments, it is poised to have a massive impact on the world. That's what I mean :)
Why are you focusing on the darker side of the deep web instead of the good side? Its virtues clearly outweigh the illegal stuff. As someone who appreciates the privacy benefits of Bitcoin, TOR and the Deep Web, I am concerned about the public's disproportionate focus on its negative and illegal uses. Do you plan to address this bias at all? Question 1: I am absolutely not only focusing on the dark side of the Deep Web. In fact one of my key points is that the Deep Web is misrepresented, and inaccurately represented. It is mostly just a reference to all the content on the web that is not indexed. Most of which is not dark and a lot of which is frankly boring private data :)
Are you accepting Bitcoin for the financing of this film? If not, why not? Again, thanks for doing this, but I am concerned that your focus on the negative side of TOR will continue to twist the public's perception in the wrong direction. 2: We will absolutely be accepting BTC for the movie. But Kickstarter does not accept BTC so we are doing that separately. Stay tuned!
3: Yes the bias is a big problem and we will debunk the myths, just as I did with Downloaded. People like to hold onto their preconceptions tho, so I have no illusions about turning the world around :) A lot of people loved my Napster movie, but there were many in the mainstream press who were outraged that I didn't spend more time castigating the Napster architects for being thieves who created piracy software, when clearly that is not the truth, just the well-spun myth. but myths die hard.
How concerned are you with getting all the details right? You plan to talk about things happening in the more obscure and less legal parts of the Internet. The people who use those parts of the Internet are often pretty knowledgeable about the fine technical details, and are annoyed when people get them wrong. Even the term "Deep Web" has a whiff of "Information Superhighway" or "Series of Tubes" about it. Aside from just wanting to get the details right for the sake of having an informative and accurate documentary, are you concerned at all with upsetting the wrong kinds of people by doing this? After all, the guy behind Silk Road is rumoured to have tried(?) to have people killed. Our film isn't a Silk Road movie but an exploration of the history and evolution of the Deep Web, as told by its architects. That is the story that I believe matters most :)
Are you covering other crypto currencies? Also, I didn't think porn hid on the internet. I am yes. This movie is largely about the crypto-revolution.
What are your thoughts on the rather dubious "hired a hitman" charges against DPR (Ross Ulbricht)? Do you think law enforcement used parallel construction to identify the SR server or otherwise make the case against SDPR? Looking forward to this documentary, and I'm a huge fan of Bill and Ted! It's a really fascinating case that is unfolding and changing constantly. No one knows the full story at the moment outside of the Feds, and I'm sure they're chasing some crazy leads trying to iron it all out!
Hey Alex I was just wondering if you used Silk Road for movie research and what the movie is gonna be about? The site used to pride themselves on anonymity so is it a lot of speculation about what goes on behind the curtain or were you able to actually talk to and interview the people behind the scenes of the website? I didn't use SR for research but am in contact with many people close to the world and story.
Can I donate to the Deep Web movie via Bitcoin? I loved the Napster doc, and am super excited for this one, since judging by your prior work I think it will be very high quality. There was no bitcoin address listed on the kickstarter page! Yes Kickstarter does not allow BitCoin pledges. We will have a BitCoin option soon!
Bitcoin is seen as a "dirty" term by the media as it usually relates to illicit activities, what could make it a more clean and friendly method of payment to Joe Smith who runs a small florist in a mid size town in Washington? Time. people need to get used to crypto-currency. it's here to stay and perfectly legitimate unto itself.
I've always been a fan of Bill and Ted, however this question does not related to your career. You actually grew up next to my Dad (His name is Nick) in St. Louis/Clayton. He said your family loved television, and that he always joked your television might blow up one day. As ridiculous as that sounds apparently it actually happened to you guys one day. So did this actually happen? Is my father a liar? How much television does it take before it explodes? Wow that is some ancient history! Yes when I was five my brother and I got into a fight and someone hit the tv with their body, hard (such is the way of fraternal skirmishes, my bro and I have actually always been super close). We didn't know we had blown some of the electricals inside the TV and the next time it was turned on it exploded into flames (for real!) and burned the whole house down (totally true story!!)
What are your thoughts on other cryptocurrencies like Litecoin? I think it is early days for crypto-currency and eventually one will rule the roost. Whichever proves to be the most stable, trustworthy and provides the best ease of use.
I just hope that it's objective and that it doesn't needlessly throw BitCoin into dis-appeal. I mean, there have been other digital currencies which had been used for drugs, hitmen, child porn, whatever else. Sigh. Just don't slander it, k? <3 I totally agree with you, that's the movie :)
Are you worried about how Deep Web will portray bitcoin? Us bitcoin folks are already rather irritated about how much people make the point that bitcoin is used for illegal things, without pointing out that cash is used for the same thing. Oh we are making very very clear all the legitimate uses for Bitcoin.
Alex, do you think that Satoshi Nakamoto has any sort of link or relationship to Ross Ulbricht? Yes some people have been saying that. There are other people believed to have created Bitcoin that we are talking to.
What are your personal thoughts on the deep web and how it operates? Do you think the bit coin business model is the future of personal commerce? I do yes.
Don't you think it is a little early to start writing a story before the truth is completely released? I've been following the take down since day one and there are still so many things that haven't been answered. Absolutely. Our movie is about the Deep Web, it's not a Silk Road movie.
What do you think about Silk Road 2.0 being open? Inevitable.
Have you been able to get any key actors in Bitcoin, Silk Road etc to go on the record unanonymously? BTW...San Dimas HS football rules! Yes we have :)
I live in San Dimas. Do you know what you've done to me any time I meet people from out of town? Sorry. truly. We didn't shoot there, we shot it in Phoenix, so I never thought about San Dimas one way or the other. Until many years later I made the mistake of taking my kids to the water park there without thinking about it. Very very very VERY big mistake for "Bill" to waltz into a water park in San Dimas...
What do you think George Carlin would have said about Bitcoin and Silk Road? Link to www.youtube.com
Can you please make sure that bitcoin ends up not getting the image of "crack dollars"? I'd like if people didn't associate bitcoins with just silk road. Agree!!
Bill& Ted 3: elaborate please! We have the script and our producing team on board, in finance mode now... :)
What is socrates like in real life. A windbag.
New Idiot Box sketches on YouTube please. Burrowing Bishop, If I Had My Way, etc.etc. I think everything we shot has made its way up there :)
I have yet to ever have a question answered in an AMA, not a question but a simple acknowledgment of my existence would be fantastic. Love BnT BTW. You exist!!!
We demand a sequel to Freaked. That is all. Me too! One day... many many eons from now... it will happen...
Can you give me 3 words that will best describe the movie to me. Join our Kickstarter! :)
Last updated: 2013-11-29 19:11 UTC
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The Winklevoss Twins. Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss, Bitcoin early adopters and influencers of the early development of Facebook itself also have considerable accumulated Bitcoin. Both of them invested around $11 million in Bitcoin back in 2013 totalling 1% of the total supply at that time. Now this crypto is worth more than $600 million according to latest valuation with some estimates ... Winklevoss Twins Sue Charlie Shrem, Silk Road Felon The former felon owes the twins money, and now that he has been buying himself luxury items, they want it . Simon Golstein News (CryptoCurrency ) Sunday, 04/11/2018 11:41 GMT+2 2018-11-04T09:41:22+00:00 2018-11-06T14:32:39+00:00. Photo: Charlie Shrem. Share this article. Finance Magnates Telegram Channel; Charlie Shrem, the former ... Instant Bitcoin Sites - Winklevoss Twins Bitcoin Instant Bitcoin Sites How To Buy Bitcoin With Credit Card How To Purchase Bitcoin Diamond Bitcoin entrepreneurs and Gemini founders Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss have been ordered to pay USD 45,000 in legal costs in an ongoing case from 2013 against convicted BitInstant owner Charlie Shrem.. The payment relates to a lengthy court case in which the Winklevoss twins had instigated an investigation and asset freeze on Shrem concerning money owed to the brothers from a Bitcoin trade ... The Winklevoss twins were early Bitcoin advocates but have never revealed their total holding — though it was said to be worth $11 million in April, when the crypto-currency peaked at $266 ...

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