How to compile and install Bitcoin Core on Debian Wheezy

How to compile and install Bitcoin Core on Debian

How to compile and install Bitcoin Core on Debian submitted by muyuu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to compile and install Bitcoin Core on Debian Wheezy

submitted by mcfc_as to linux [link] [comments]

How to compile and install Bitcoin Core on Debian

How to compile and install Bitcoin Core on Debian submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Compiling from Source on a small USBArmory/RasPi (Debian) /r/Bitcoin

Compiling from Source on a small USBArmory/RasPi (Debian) /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Government: "Encryption is now banned." Law-abiding citizen: "OK". Terrorist: "Yeah, right. Debian Linux and PGP compiled from source code." Result: The average guy there is surveilled 24/7 but terrorists continue to encrypt their stuff just fine. /r/Bitcoin

Government: submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Whonix lead developer wants to maintain a debian repository for the Monero GUI for two years. Comment on the proposal!

Whonix lead developer wants to maintain a debian repository for the Monero GUI for two years. Comment on the proposal! submitted by Rehrar to Monero [link] [comments]

Delightful Privacy

Delightful Privacy delightful

This is a collection of software, operating systems, and other miscellaneous tools to help the average user fight for their privacy and security online.

Operating Systems

Fedora

Fedora uses Security-Enhanced Linux by default, which implements a variety of security policies, including mandatory access controls, which Fedora adopted early on. Fedora provides a hardening wrapper, and does hardening for all of its packages by using compiler features such as position-independent executable (PIE). Wikipedia

Pop!_OS

Pop!_OS provides full out-of-the-box support for both AMD and Nvidia GPUs. It is regarded as an easy distribution to set-up for gaming, mainly due to its built-in GPU support. Pop!_OS provides default disk encryption, streamlined window and workspace management, keyboard shortcuts for navigation as well as built in power management profiles. The latest releases also have packages that allow for easy setup for TensorFlow and CUDA. Wikipedia

Debian

Debian is one of the oldest operating systems based on the Linux kernel. The project is coordinated over the Internet by a team of volunteers guided by the Debian Project Leader and three foundational documents: the Debian Social Contract, the Debian Constitution, and the Debian Free Software Guidelines. New distributions are updated continually, and the next candidate is released after a time-based freeze. Wikipedia

openSUSE Tumbleweed - Rolling Release!

Any user who wishes to have the newest packages that include, but are not limited to, the Linux Kernel, SAMBA, git, desktops, office applications and many other packages, will want Tumbleweed. openSUSE

For enhanced security

Qubes OS

Qubes OS is a security-focused desktop operating system that aims to provide security through isolation. Virtualization is performed by Xen, and user environments can be based on Fedora, Debian, Whonix, and Microsoft Windows, among other operating systems. Wikipedia

Tails

Tails, or The Amnesic Incognito Live System, is a security-focused Debian-based Linux distribution aimed at preserving privacy and anonymity. All its incoming and outgoing connections are forced to go through Tor, and any non-anonymous connections are blocked. Wikipedia).*

Whonix

Whonix is a Debian GNU/Linux–based security-focused Linux distribution. It aims to provide privacy, security and anonymity on the internet. The operating system consists of two virtual machines, a "Workstation" and a Tor "Gateway", running Debian GNU/Linux. All communications are forced through the Tor network to accomplish this. Wikipedia

Web Browsers

For Desktop

Firefox Needs manual tweaking to be more secure! Use ghacks

Firefox, is a free and open-source web browser developed by the Mozilla Foundation and its subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation. Wikipedia Recommended addons: uBlock Origin | Https Everywhere | Privacy Badger | Privacy Possum | Decentraleyes | NoScript | CanvasBlocker

Tor

Tor is free and open-source software for enabling anonymous communication. The name derived from the acronym for the original software project name "The Onion Router". Tor directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer overlay network consisting of more than seven thousand relays to conceal a user's location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis. Using Tor makes it more difficult to trace Internet activity to the user. Wikipedia

UnGoogled-Chromium

Without signing in to a Google Account, Chromium does pretty well in terms of security and privacy. However, Chromium still has some dependency on Google web services and binaries. In addition, Google designed Chromium to be easy and intuitive for users, which means they compromise on transparency and control of internal operations.
ungoogled-chromium addresses these issues in the following ways:

For mobile

Bromite Android Only

Bromite is a Chromium fork with ad blocking and privacy enhancements; take back your browser! Bromite

Firefox Focus Android - iOS

Firefox Focus is a free and open-source privacy-focused browser from Mozilla, available for Android and iOS. Wikipedia

Tor Browser for mobile Android - iOS

Tor protects your privacy on the internet by hiding the connection between your Internet address and the services you use. We believe Tor is reasonably secure, but please ensure you read the instructions and configure it properly. GitHub

Email

Tutanota

Tutanota is an end-to-end encrypted email software and freemium hosted secure email service. Wikipedia

Mailbox

There are many ears listening on the Internet, which is why all our services require mandatory SSL/TLS-encrypted data transmission. For additional security, we also use enhanced (green) security certificates ("EV") by the independent SwissSign trust service provider from Switzerland (Check the padlock symbol in your web browser's URL field). But this is just the beginning – there is so much more that we do. Mailbox

Disroot

Disroot is a decentralized cloud-based service that allows you to store your files and communicate with one another. Established by a privacy-focused organization of volunteers, if we look at Disroot as an email provider specifically, it stands out thanks to its emphasis on security with a completly free open-source approach. ProPrivacy

ProtonMail

ProtonMail is an end-to-end encrypted email service founded in 2013 in Geneva, Switzerland by scientists who met at the CERN research facility. ProtonMail uses client-side encryption to protect email content and user data before they are sent to ProtonMail servers, unlike other common email providers such as Gmail and Outlook.com. The service can be accessed through a webmail client, the Tor network, or dedicated iOS and Android apps. Wikipedia

Search Engine

Searx

searx is a free metasearch engine, available under the GNU Affero General Public License version 3, with the aim of protecting the privacy of its users. To this end, searx does not share users' IP addresses or search history with the search engines from which it gathers results. Tracking cookies served by the search engines are blocked, preventing user-profiling-based results modification. By default, searx queries are submitted via HTTP POST, to prevent users' query keywords from appearing in webserver logs. Wikipedia - Find public instances of searx here searx.space

Startpage

Startpage is a web search engine that highlights privacy as its distinguishing feature. Previously, it was known as the metasearch engine Ixquick, At that time, Startpage was a variant service. Both sites were merged in 2016. Wikipedia

YaCy

YaCy is a free distributed search engine, built on principles of peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. Its core is a computer program written in Java distributed on several hundred computers, as of September 2006, so-called YaCy-peers. Each YaCy-peer independently crawls through the Internet, analyzes and indexes found web pages, and stores indexing results in a common database (so called index) which is shared with other YaCy-peers using principles of P2P networks. It is a free search engine that everyone can use to build a search portal for their intranet and to help search the public internet clearly. Wikipedia

VPN

If you need anonymity and privacy online use Tor instead, if you are looking to bypass a geo-restriction, don't trust public WiFi, or are looking to Torrent, a VPN will help you.

Mullvad

Mullvad is an open-source commercial virtual private network (VPN) service based in Sweden. Launched in March 2009, Mullvad operates using the WireGuard and OpenVPN protocols. Mullvad accepts Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash for subscriptions in addition to conventional payment methods.
No email address or other identifying information is requested during Mullvad's registration process. Rather, a unique 16-digit account number is anonymously generated for each new user. This account number is henceforth used to log in to the Mullvad service.
The TechRadar review notes that "The end result of all this is you don't have to worry about how Mullvad handles court requests to access your usage data, because, well, there isn't any." Wikipedia

ProtonVPN

ProtonVPN utilizes OpenVPN (UDP/TCP) and the IKEv2 protocol, with AES-256 encryption. The company has a strict no-logging policy for user connection data, and also prevents DNS and Web-RTC leaks from exposing users' true IP addresses. ProtonVPN also includes Tor access support and a kill switch to shut off Internet access in the event of a lost VPN connection.
In January 2020, ProtonVPN became the first VPN provider to release its source code on all platforms and conduct an independent security audit. ProtonVPN is the only VPN to do so, even though experts say this is a crucial factor in deciding whether to trust a VPN service. Wikipedia

For information about alternatives to software and services.

If you are looking for alternatives to proprietary services like Discord and Facebook, or an open-source alternative to Photoshop, check out our list about Awesome-Alternatives

Mirrors are kept up to date, this post may lag behind as we add stuff in.

submitted by CipherOps to LinuxCafe [link] [comments]

[IDEA] [PROPOSAL] Monero Debian (deb) packages / Debian package repository deb.getmonero.org (I can do)

I have the skills to implement this if wanted.
Possible User Experience
This is a proposal, i.e. not implemented yet. Instructions for users, simplified.
How to install monero using apt-get
Download the repository signing key.
wget https://www.getmonero.org/monero.asc
Add the signing key.
sudo apt-key --keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/monero.gpg add ~/monero.asc
Add APT repository.
echo "deb https://deb.getmonero.org buster main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/monero.list
Update your package lists.
sudo apt-get update
Install monero.
sudo apt-get install monero
A few technical implementation details
I would simply grab the binaries provided by getmonero.org, download them, check software (gpg) signatures, put these into deb packages, add these to a repository, and upload the repository.
What I would not do is creating the binaries during package creation. While this is nice to have, it doesn't help user experience and blocks the progress on reaching this goal. See next chapter.
Why simply put the pre-build Monero binaries into a deb package?
1) After bitcoin existing for more than 10 years, being popular and being in Debian unstable (sid) it still never made its way into Debian testing, let alone stable. Reason being explained that a difference in underlying libraries (even just security fixes) during compilation may result in a network split. Binaries compiled during packaging on different versions of Linux distributions might have different libraries that might cause a network fork / chain split.
References:
(Note: above website saying Tags: fixed-upstream is probably a mistake as discussion at bottom says.)
2) The github issue of packaging monero stalled.
3) By shipping the same binaries as provided by getmonero.org reduces the chances of introducing a backdoor.
Many Options
Timeline
Doable quickly. The electrum (bitcoin) AppImage was recently added to a Debian package (binaries-freedom) by me and is now easily installable in Whonix. Pre-installed in testers version of Whonix already.
About Me
I am the founder of Whonix, which I am maintaining at present for more than 7 years.
Whonix (formerly TorBOX) is a Debian GNU/Linux–based security-focused Linux distribution. It aims to provide privacy, security and anonymity on the internet.
You can see an overview of packages I am maintaining on my github profile.
To proof that this forum account adrelanos corresponds the same person maintaining whonix.org, it is added here.
Questions
What happened to, what is the successor of the forum funding system?
submitted by adrelanos to Monero [link] [comments]

Segregated Witness reached 2000 nodes!

I noticed 0.13.1 just achieved 2000 full nodes. :)
https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/
https://bitnodes.21.co/dashboard/?days=90
submitted by -Hayo- to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

F2Pool has clarified it's position.

F2Pool has clarified it's position. submitted by chris_eu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A Guide to Keeping Keys Offline Using Armory +rPi

Hi Redditors.
I am going to post in this thread my experiences in getting my Desktop (Debian) machine running Armory in watch-only mode, and coupling that with an offline Raspberry Pi (which holds my private keys) for signing the transactions previously made in watch-only mode.
I actually compiled Armory from source directly on my Pi. This guide is probably more for the bitcoin 'power user', as to run Armory online, and broadcast the signed transactions, you need to have a bitcoin full node running (bitcoind).
Basic requirements:
Aimed-for Setup:
I'll post the guide in digestible sections...

Section 1

I should begin by saying I installed source code from git, and got Armory to build the DB on my desktop initially, WITHOUT creating a wallet.. (This allowed me to debug what was going on a little!)
Go to Bitcoin.org, select Armory..
It leads to a Download from Git:
https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory/releases
Followed the procedure for Linux Debian verify code, compile, install, all straight-forward..
Began by running bitcoind, and telling Armory where to find it. This is the command I used, obviously it was all on one line and didn't include the arrows/explanations!:
python ArmoryQt.py \ --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks \ # <-----(where my bitcoind blocks live) --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi \ # <-----(this is instead of ~/.armory) --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases # <-------(again, non std. place used for Armory's databases.. my choice.) 
So, on the Desktop, after the initial "build databases"
(NB the initial "Build Databases" took about 1.5h and my two CPUs were maxed the whole time, Temps up to 62C. Not ideal; Im not in a rush!)
I then wanted to import a watch-only wallet.
Before I did this, I took a full backup of the Armory data dir:
/ArmoryDataDi
(or ~/.armory in a default installation).
I'd hate to have to make Armory do another full sync with the bitcoind node!

Section 2

Next step: offline wallet (with Private Keys) is on a Raspberry Pi.
I downloaded the source and managed to compile it on the pi itself! :)
Though there were some gymnastics needed to setup the Pi.
My Pi is running Raspbian based on Wheezy.. quite old!
I did the following on the Pi:
apt-get update apt-get upgrade (<---took about an hour!) apt-get install autotools-dev apt-get install autoconf 
Then I followed the instructions exactly as I had done for my Debian Desktop machine, EXCEPT:
I had to increase the Pi's swap space. I upped it from 100Mb to 400Mb.
The compilation took 7 hours, and my poor SD card got a thrashing.
But after compilation, I put the Swap back to 100Mb and Armory runs ok with about 150Mb of memory (no swap needed).
Swap increase on the Pi:
use your favourite editor, and open the file /etc/dphys-swapfile
add/change the following line:
CONF_SWAPSIZE=400 
Then, REBOOT the Pi:
sudo shutdown -h -P now 
Once the compilation was done on the Pi, put the swap back, rebooted and created an Armory wallet.
I added manual entropy and upped the encryption 'time' from 250ms to 2500ms - since the Pi is slow, but I'll be happy to wait for more iterations in the Key Derivation Function.
Once the wallet was created, it obviously prompts you for backup.
I want to add a private key of my own (i.e. import), so don't do the backup until this is over.
I import my Private Key, and Armory checks that this corresponds to a Public Key, which I check is correct.
This is the point now where the Pi storage medium (e.g an SD card) has to be properly destroyed if you ever get rid of it.
I had thought that now would be a good time to decide if your new wallet will generate Segwit receiving addresses, and also addresses used to receive 'change' after a transaction..
But it seems Armory WON'T let you switch to P2SH-P2WPKH unless your Armory is connected to a node offering "WITNESS" service.
Obviously, my Pi is offline and will never connect to a node, so the following will not work on the Pi:
NB: I thought about setting this on the Debian "watch-only" wallet, but that would surely mean doom, as the Pi would not know about those addresses and backups might not keep them.. who knows...
So, end result:- no segwit for me just yet in my offline funds.

--If anyone can offer a solution to this, I'd be very grateful--

Section 3

Ok, now this is a good point to back up your wallet on the Pi. It has your imported keys. I choose a Digital Backup - and put it on a USB key, which will never touch the internet and will be stored off-site. I also chose to encrypt it, because I'm good with passwords..
NB: The Armory paper backup will NOT back up your imported private keys, so keep those somewhere if you're not sweeping them. It would be prudent to have an Armory paper backup anyway, but remember it will likely NOT help you with that imported key.
Now for the watch-only copy of the wallet. I want to get the "watch-only" version onto my Desktop Debian machine.
On the Pi, I created (exported to a USB key) a "watching-only" copy of my wallet.
I would use the RECOMMENDED approach, export the "Entire Wallet File".
As you will see below, I initially exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key I entered manually above (i.e. the public Key!).
Now, back on the Debian Desktop machine...
I stopped all my crontab jobs; just give Armory uninterrupted CPU/memory/disk...
I also stopped bitcoind and made a backup prior to any watch-only wallet being imported.
I already made a backup of Armory on my Desktop, before any wallet import.
(this was needed, as I made a mistake.. see below)
So on the Debian Desktop machine, I begin by firing up bitcoind.
my command for this is:
./bitcoind -daemon -datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414 -dbcache=400 -maxmempool=400 

Section 4

I try running Armory like this:
(I'm actually starting Armory from a script - StartArm.sh)
Inside the script StartArm.sh, it has the line:
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage=4 --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
I know from bitter experience that doing a scan over the blockchain for a new wallet takes a looong time and a lot of CPU, and I'd like it to play nicely; not gobble all the memory and swap and run my 2xCPUs both at 100% for four hours...
So... I aim to run with --ram-usage=X and --thread-count=X
(For me in the end, X=1 but I began with X=4)
I began with --ram-usage=4 (<--- = 4x128Mb)
The result is below...
TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 
It didn't recognise the ram-usage and carried on, crippling my Debian desktop PC.
This is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up, and it can take over 30 minutes just to exit nicely from bitcoind and ArmoryDB.
So, I ssh to the machine from another computer, and keep an eye on it with the command
"free -h" 
I'd also be able to do a "sudo reboot now" if needed from here.

Section 5

So, trying to get my --ram-usage command recognised, I tried this line (added quotes):
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="4" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
But no, same error...
Loading Armory Engine: Armory Version: 0.96.4 Armory Build: None PyBtcWallet Version: 1.35 Detected Operating system: Linux OS Variant : ('debian', '9.4', '') User home-directory : /home/ Satoshi BTC directory : /BlockChain/chain20180414 Armory home dir : /ArmoryDataDi ArmoryDB directory : /ArmoryDataDidatabases Armory settings file : /ArmoryDataDiArmorySettings.txt Armory log file : /ArmoryDataDiarmorylog.txt Do wallet checking : True (ERROR) ArmoryUtils.py:3723 - Unsupported language specified. Defaulting to English (en) (ERROR) ArmoryQt.py:1833 - Failed to start Armory database: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects Traceback (most recent call last): File "ArmoryQt.py", line 1808, in startArmoryDBIfNecessary TheSDM.spawnDB(str(ARMORY_HOME_DIR), TheBDM.armoryDBDir) File "/BitcoinArmory/SDM.py", line 387, in spawnDB pargs.append('--ram-usage=' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 

Section 6

So, I edit the Armory python file SDM.py:
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=4') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =4 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) 
Running it, I now have acknowledgement of the --ram-usage=4:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=4 
Also, even with ram-usage=4, it used too much memory, so I told it to quit.
It took over 30 minutes to stop semi-nicely. The last thing it reported was:
ERROR - 00:25:21: (StringSockets.cpp:351) FcgiSocket::writeAndRead FcgiError: unexpected fcgi header version 
But that didn't seem to matter or corrupt the Armory Database, so I think it's ok.
So, I get brave and change SDM.py as below, and I make sure my script has a command line for --ram-usage="ABCDE" and --thread-count="FGHIJ"; the logic being that these strings "ABCDE" will pass the IF criteria below, and my hardcoded values will be used...
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) if ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT != -1 pargs.append('--thread-count=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 #' + ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT) 
So, as usual, I use my script and start this with: ./StartArm.sh
(which uses command line:)
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="ABCDE" --thread-count="FGHIJ" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
(this forces it to use my hard-coded values in SDM.py...)
So, this is the command which it reports that it starts with:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=1 --thread-count=1 
Again, this is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up. So I ssh to the machine and keep an eye on it with:
"free -h" 

Section 7

So, on the Debian Desktop PC, I inserted the USB stick with the watch-only wallet I exported from the Pi.
Start Armory...
Import "Entire Wallet File" watch-only copy.
Wait 4 hours..
YAY!!!
After running Armory for about 30m, the memory usage dropped by 400m... wierd...
It took ~2 hours to get 40% completion.
After 3.5 hours it's almost there...
The memory went up to about 1.7Gb in use and 900Mb of Swap, but the machine remained fairly responsive throughout, apart from a few (10?) periods at the start, where it appeared to freeze for 10-30s at a time.
(That's where my ssh session came in handy - I could check the machine was still ok with a "free -h" command)
Now, I can:
Create an unsigned transaction on my Desktop,
Save the tx to USB stick,
Move to the Pi,
Sign the tx,
Move back to the Desktop,
Broadcast the signed tx.

Section 8

My initial Mistake:
This caused me to have to roll-back my Armory database, using the backup. so you should try to avoid doing this..
On the Pi, I exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key
It is RECOMMENDED to use the Digital Export of Entire Wallet File from the Pi when making a watch-only copy. If you just export just the "ROOT data", not the "Entire Wallet File", you'll have problems if you used an imported Private Key in the offline wallet, like I did.
Using the ROOT data text import, after it finished... my balance was zero. So,. I tried a Help->Rescan Balance (Restart Armory, takes 1minute to get back up and running) No Luck. Still zero balance.
So, I try Rescan Databases.. This will take longer. Nah.. no luck.
So, I tried again, thinking it might be to do with the fact that I imported the text "root data" stuff, instead of following the (Recommended) export of watching-wallet file.
So, I used my Armory backup, and wound back the ArmoryDataDi to the point before the install of the (zero balance) wallet. (you should not need to do this, as you will hopefully use the RECOMMENDED approach of exporting the "Entire Wallet File"!)
submitted by fartinator to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Compiling instructions?

Could we get some compiling instructions for Bitcoin SV? I'm having a hard time compiling it to run on my server alongside a bitcoin node. When I try to start it up after compiling, it says unable to start HTTP server. Also, the wallet functions are limited because for whatever reason I can't get it to use the Berkeleys DB.

Please post some terminal commands for Ubuntu/Debian based installation :) thanks
submitted by mrbitcoinman to bitcoinsv [link] [comments]

Dogecoin on Linux - The Complete Beginner's Guide

I'm writing this because I couldn't find a single condensed guide on compiling the wallet and running mining software on linux, specficially Ubuntu/Linux Mint. I combed Bitcoin and Litecoin forums for similar problems I was running into and eventually got everything nailed down, so here it is in one place, for new Shibes.
If you want to make a Dogecoin directory in your downloads folder to keep things organized, you will need to modify these commands to refelct the change. So instead of going to ~/Downloads/ you will need to go to ~/Downloads/Dogecoin and be sure to put the zipped files there when you download them, but the commands will be the same otherwise.
cwayne18 put in the work to make a PPA for the QT client here.
Ubunutu/Mint/Debian users should be able to install the client with the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cwayne18/doge sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dogecoin-qt 
To update using this method, run
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade dogecoin-qt 
Compiling the Wallet Manually
I suggest using the PPA above, but if you want to compile manually, here you go.
1)Download the newest source from here. If you want to check out the Github page, click here
2)Unzip the package with the native client OR, navigate to your downloads and unzip
cd ~/Downloads unzip dogecoin-master.zip 
3)Now it's time to compile. You will need to install the dependencies, just copy and paste the following code. It will be a fairly large download and could take some time. It is always important to update before installing any new software, so we'll do that first and then install the dependencies.
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install libssl-dev libdb-dev libdb++-dev libqrencode-dev qt4-qmake libqtgui4 libqt4-dev sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev libminiupnpc8 libboost-all-dev build-essential git libboost1.53-all-dev 
4)Once that is done, go to the doge-coin master directory and compile:
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste sed -i 's/-mgw46-mt-sd-1_53//g' dogecoin-qt.pro qmake USE_UPNP=- USE_QRCODE=0 USE_IPV6=0 make -j3 
After running the qmake command you will likely see some text similar to
Project MESSAGE: Building without UPNP support Project MESSAGE: Building with UPNP supportRemoved plural forms as the target language has less forms. If this sounds wrong, possibly the target language is not set or recognized. 
It's perfectly normal, so don't worry about that.
Your Dogewallet is ready to go! The executable is in ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste and called dogecoin-qt. Your wallet information is in ~/.dogecoin. You can run the wallet at any time by opening terminal and typing
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste ./dogecoin-qt 
Future upgrades to dogewallet are easy. Back up your wallet.dat, and simply follow the same directions above, but you'll be unzipping and building the newer version. You will likely need to rename the old dogecoin-master directory in ~/Downloads before unzipping the newest version and building. Also, it is likely that you will not need to install the dependencies again.
Alternate Method For Installing Dogecoin Wallet from Nicebreakfast
After installing the dependencies listed in step 3, open terminal, then navigate to where you want Dogecoin Wallet stored and run:
git clone https://github.com/dogecoin/dogecoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make 
then when the wallet is updated just run
git pull 
from the dogecoin directory.
GPU Mining
GPU mining requires CGminer. My suggestion is to get the executable already built. The creator of cgminer has removed the built file from his website, but I've uploaded it here
sudo apt-get install pkg-config opencl-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev autoconf libtool automake m4 ncurses-dev cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built.tar.bz2 
Don't use anything newer than 3.7.2. The newer versions of CGMiner don't support GPU mining.
That's it! You have cgminer ready to go! You will run cgminer with the following syntax
cd ~/Downloads/cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built/ ./cgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://SERVERNAME:PORT -u WORKER.ID -p PASS 
A good guide for fine tuning cgminer can be found here; follow the litecoin example.
EDIT
I had trouble getting cgminer running with a single line command, but running it via an executable .sh file works. This is covered in the cgminer setup guide I posted above but I'll put it here too. In the same directory that has the cgminer executable, you need to make a file called cgminer.sh and make it executable. It should contain the follwing:
export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export DISPLAY=:0 find *.bin -delete sleep 5 ./cgminer 
Then you can call cgminer in terminal by doing ./cgminer.sh You will need a cgminer.conf file containing all your options. All of this is covered in the guide that is linked above.
A quick note about AMD drivers: They used to be a huge PITA to install and get working, but the newest Catalyst drivers are great. There's a GUI installer, everything works out of the box, and there is a lot of documentation. You can download them here: AMD Catalyst 14.6 Beta Linux
CPU Mining
For CPU mining I use minerd because it doesn't require any work to get running, simply download it and get to work. Download the built file for your machine 32-bit or 64-bit, and then unzip it and you're ready to go!
cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf pooler-cpuminer-2.3.2-linux-x86.tar.gz 
The executable is called minerd and it will be in ~/Downloads but you can move it to wherever you like. To run it, pull up terminal and do
cd ~/Downloads minerd --url=stratum+tcp://SERVER:PORT --userpass=USERNAME.WORKERNAME:WORKERPASSWORD 
You're done! Happy mining!
Common Issues
I ran into this and I've seen others with this problem as well. Everything installs fine but there is a shared library file that isn't where it should be. In fact, it isn't there at all.
 libudev.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory 
In terminal, do
sudo updatedb locate libudev.so.0.13.0 
And it will probably return a path /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu. Inside that directory there's a library file called libudev.so.0.13.0. You'll need to make a symlink (aka shortcut) that links libudev.so.1 to libudev.so.0.13.0 So, assuming you're working with libudev.so.0.13.0 do this
cd /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu sudo ln -s libudev.so.0.13.0 libudev.so.1 
Now if you do
ln -l 
You should see
libudev.so.1 -> ./libudev.so.0.13.0 
Meaning you've made the symlink. Also, the text for libudev.so.1 will be blue.
submitted by Boozybrain to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Homelab collective ressources post!

Hey guys!
I'm fairly new to this sub and to having a home lab in general and I found this community to be so kind and helping, I wanted to give back what I've learned. I'm seeing a lot of questions asked around on improvements and on what to do with x extra hardware so I thought it would be nice to have a thread to regroup that.
 
I'll put here some stuff I gathered and the most common questions I've seen, feel free to contribute and i'll update the post along.
 
Latest Additions
 
Homelab Dashboard
Posts about dashboards have been growing lately and here are some of the best that were kind enough to provide us with their sources.
User Screenshot Source
yours truly http://imgur.com/a/GhCNH https://github.com/Gabisonfire/dashboard-q
lastditchefrt http://i.imgur.com/5zQdao4.png https://github.com/d4rk22/Network-Status-Page
_SleepingBag_ http://i.imgur.com/Ql9ZM4W.png https://github.com/jsank/homelabdash
NiknakSi https://niknak.org/extras/sysinfo TBA
DainBramaged http://imgur.com/jYNlUEQ https://github.com/gordonturneBigBoard
michaelh4u https://i.imgur.com/XkZwMKj.png https://github.com/michaelh4u/homelabfrontpage
spigotx http://imgur.com/a/1zMht https://github.com/spigotx/HomeLab2
SirMaster https://nicko88.com/ https://github.com/dashbad/plex-server-status
yourofl10 http://imgur.com/a/AyROa TBA
TheBobWiley http://imgur.com/a/oU6d3 https://github.com/TheBobWiley/ManageThis-LandingPages
0110010001100010 http://i.imgur.com/iwtQcsL.jpg https://github.com/danodemano/monitoring-scripts
mescon & SyNiK4L https://i.imgur.com/gqdVM6p.jpg https://github.com/mescon/Muximux
ak_rex http://i.imgur.com/a/RJkrT https://github.com/ak-rex/homelab-dashboard
 
Or build yours from scratch: PRTG API, ELK, Grafana, freeboard, JumpSquares
 
Some other resources: Custom Monitoring Scripts by 0110010001100010
 
Credits to apt64 for his original post
= Pi specific =
 
= Download Automation =
 
= Virtualization =
 
= Monitoring =
 
= Media Center =
 
= Remote access =
 
= VOIP =
 
= Networking =
 
= File Servers/Storage/RAID =
 
= Cameras =
 
= Documentation =
 
= Dynamic DNS =
 
= Backup =
 
= Creating network diagrams =
 
= Guides =
 
= Misc =
 
That's all I could come up with on top of my head + some research, passing over to you guys so we can get a nice complete list!
 
Let's try and stick with free(or mostly) softwares, let me know if you guys feel otherwise.
submitted by Gabisonfire to homelab [link] [comments]

Is there a favourable distro when installing bitcoin on a VPS?

Currently trying to install bitcoind on my VPS and it's running CentOS 5.11. It's less easy than I expected; having to compile a few things. There's no yum install bitcoin.
Would I be better off with Debian or Arch or something? Or if I manage to get this up and running on CentOS it's not going to make much of a difference in the long run?
Aside: This is my first time trying to install bitcoin on a VPS. I just want to get a node running, then display some information about the node on a webpage (making RPC requests via PHP). Please feel free to dish out other random tips or advice for a noob.
submitted by in3rsha to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Interesting technical facts about Groestlcoin that might explain price rise

Disclaimer: After doing some research, I own a small amount of Groestlcoin and no Vertcoin (I rkn VTC is overvalued currently). Might buy some VTC after it corrects. Here's why...
Original text: Posted by posted [–]jackielove4u 4 days ago https://www.reddit.com/groestlcoin/comments/78258z/is_grs_possibly_threatened_by_bitcoin_gold/dormg88/
Our selling points are:
submitted by enozym111 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Howto Wanted: Upgrading my Linux/Core node to BIP-148?

EDIT: Since I have gotten so much feedback that didn't help, I am completely re-wording this post.
Assume I have a bitcoin core node running on Debian stable and I would like to know how to make my node support UASF by August. I would like instructions for getting from here to there.
I see the binaries. I see the source code. And I can compile source code if needed. But that is at best one step. What would I do once I have the binary?
submitted by ImStillRollin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Let's build an army of Ethereum nodes!

Hi everyone!
I ran into Ethereum several months ago while reading about bitcoin and the blockchain and was quite impressed by some videos explaining the project (most of them by Vitalik himself). During this time I've tried to educate myself on this breakthrough technology. And at this point, I'd like to get a little more involved. I think that one easy way to contribute to this fascinating project is by running a full Ethereum node, so let me share some stuff of my experience of setting up an Ethereum node on Raspberry Pi 3.
While doing some research about the best Ethereum client for my raspberry Pi 3 I realized that pretty much there are no ARM nodes on the network (according to ethernodes.org). Shouldn't be precisely the opposite? ARM devices such as Raspberry Pi have a good performance, are cheap and power-efficient.
I looked into "EthEmbedded" [1] (great project, by the way) but it is mainly focused on Geth and Eth clients and you need to run the Ethereum clients manually. It's built on top of Ubuntu mate (and we need to keep things light). Besides, I was looking something more Flash & Play :-).
So, I compiled Parity from source on my raspberry Pi 3 (which is the most efficient Ethereum client out there [2]) and gave it a try. I was really surprised with the overall performance and thought that it would be great to get an Ethereum node up and running easiest way possible.
So, I built a custom Raspbian image which runs Parity as a boot up service and starts syncing the blockchain with no user interaction. This is what I got so far:
A custom [3] Raspbian [4] image with Ethcore Parity 1.3 [5] integrated. The image is generated using pi-gen [6] (plus a couple of files for Parity installation)
Some remarks:
Final thoughts:
I think there are several reasons to try to increase Ethereum ARM nodes in the coming months:
You can download the Custom Raspbian Image here:
http://www.ethraspbian.com/downloads/2016-09-09-ethraspbian.img.zip
For further installation instructions please visit:
https://github.com/diglos/pi-gen
Let me know your comments.
Let's do this. Mine is up and running :-)
TL;DR: If you want to contribute to the Ethereum network, get a Raspberry pi 3, install the OS image into your microSD card, connect the ethernet cable and power on your device. This is it, flash and play :-), you are already running an Ethereum node!
submitted by diglos76 to ethereum [link] [comments]

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

note: I had to reupload this because reddit is banning my original account for no reason. I appealed but I thought maybe someone wanted to have this content online.
Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
submitted by RedditShadowbangedMe to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Quick guide] Run a full node with btcd (an alternative to bitcoin-core) on debian

It's good to run a full node, and even better to run one with an alternative implementation to bitcoin-core.
I was surprised how easy it is to install btcd (conformal's alternative implementation of a full node). I was also surprised how little bandwidth a full node uses. This quick guide will get you up and running.
To use this method you will need debian testing (Jessie) because the version of golang on debian stable is too old. However, the binary produced will run on debian stable. You will need about 25GB free to store the blockchain, with an extra 20GB or so if you use the bootstrap.dat torrent.
Probably the same instructions will work on ubuntu (but using sudo instead of root).
INSTRUCTIONS TO RUN A FULL NODE WITH BTCD
On debian testing the steps are:
1 - as root, do
# aptitude update; aptitude install golang mercurial git 
2 - pull in and compile btcd and associated utilities as normal user,
$ mkdir btcd; cd btcd; export GOPATH=$(pwd); $ go get github.com/conformal/btcd/... 
3 - run your node
$ cd bin $ ./btcd --externalip=YOUREXTERNALIP 
(where YOUREXTERNALIP is your external IP address).
4 - on your router, forward port 8333 to the computer your node is running on. Once your node is running, check the port is open with a tool such as canyouseeme.org
5 - enjoy being part of the network!
OPTIONAL STEP A (to download the blockchain faster, to be run before step 3):
A1 - download Jeff Garzik's torrent to bootstrap the blockchain or the magnet link, magnet:?xt=urn:btih:36719ba2cecf9f3bd7c5abfb7a88e939611b536c&dn=bootstrap.dat&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.publicbt.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fcoppersurfer.tk%3A6969%2Fannounce&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fopen.demonii.com%3A1337&tr=http%3A%2F%2Fbttracker.crunchbanglinux.org%3A6969%2Fannounce (discussion here)
A2 - run as normal user,
$ ./addblock -i /whatevepath/to/youtorrent/download/bootstrap.dat 
then continue to step 3.
OPTIONAL STEP B (to throttle bandwidth):
B1 - as root, do
# aptitude install trickle 
B2 - as your normal user, instead of step 3, run (where XXX is your desired upload speed limit in KB/s)
$ trickle -u XXX ./btcd 
Edits: see comments. Added note about external IP.
submitted by _supert_ to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I'm writing a web app (Flask, Tornado) and would appreciate an expert's opinion on best practices. I don't know any other Python devs in real life :(

I don't know how/where to ask this, so if I chose the incorrect site and subreddit forward me along :)
But I've been working on a project for around a week and I don't know if I'm approaching it correctly. Right now I'm using:
I'm using Python 2.7.5, with Debian on my production server, Windows 7 with Debian VM on my dev box.
Basically, I just need help. This isn't the first web project I've done .. but it's by far the most complicated. I know I'm not doing some things right and want to fix them before it gets too far along.
I would love to talk with someone for 20 minutes about any of the following:
I'm studying CS in school but picked up all the python-web-stuff on my own over the last year or so, and I don't think I'm doing it right. As a broke college kid I can't pay for your time but might be able to exchange something instead.
Thank you in advance if you can help me with any of the above topics.
Note) I should note that everything WORKS, so this isn't a "how do I get this and this working for that to happen" -- I could finish the project without any answers. I just want to tighten security and make sure I learned things correctly while spending so much time on a "major" project for myself.
Also, I'm still waiting on the Flask text book from kickstarter if the author happens to see this post ;)
submitted by LightShadow to Python [link] [comments]

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
edit: cd git dir.
submitted by AmbitiousSpeed0 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Howto, build compile sgminer for nscrypt mining in linux Debian Compile Bitcoin's source code (0.13) Bitcoin1: Compiling and configuring Boost C++ libraries for Visual Studio Compile BTC/LTC Wallet from source on Debian based systems Bitcoin Mining - YouTube

2. Compile. make D. Installing and Running Bitcoin Core make install After that, you will be able to run Bitcoin Core by typing: bitcoind (the text based backend) bitcoin-qt (the graphical frontend) bitcoin-cli (the command-line client) E. Extra. Some useful command lines : To start bitcoin server as daemon : bitcoind -daemon This tutorial explains how to install and use Bitcoin Core on Debian Linux. Bitcoin Core is the official Bitcoin Wallet from bitcoin.org. I will use the latest version from the GIT repository at bitcoin.org. In order to compile and run, Bitcoin Core depends on some other tools which must be installed prior to compiling : Install some dependencies: For bitcoin-core. sudo apt-get install build ... This issue tracker is only for technical issues related to bitcoin-core. General bitcoin questions and/or support requests and are best directed to the Bitcoin StackExchange. For reporting security issues, please read instructions at htt... I want to use bitcoin in Debian. I want to be able to receive BTC and make payments in BTC. I want to keep my wallet locally, on my computer. I want a light client, I don't want to download the en... This tutorial explains how to install and use Bitcoin Core on Debian Linux. Bitcoin Core is the official Bitcoin Wallet from bitcoin.org. I will use the latest version from the GIT repository at bitcoin.org. In order to compile and run, Bitcoin Core depends on some other tools which must be installed prior to compiling : Install some dependencies:

[index] [10313] [19494] [32316] [4757] [3764] [28547] [863] [23534] [43729] [18422]

Howto, build compile sgminer for nscrypt mining in linux Debian

This short video shows how to compile the bitcoin source code on linux (ubunu). an easy task to do but it take some time (around 15 min) please read the instruction in the official github https ... Hi all, this is a guide for compiling sgminer in linux, for mining altcoins , like vertcoin, murraycoin, spaincoin and many others altcoins based on bitcoin but with nscrypt algo. Im using Debian ... How to compile and run BTC/LTC Wallet from source on Debian based systems. Good work! An installation guide on debian-based linux distributions for bcoin bitcoin implementation. Compile Bitcoin's source code (0.13) - Duration: 6:12. Badr Bellaj 6,003 views. 6:12 . Marty Lobdell - Study Less Study Smart - Duration: 59:56. PierceCollegeDist11 Recommended for you. 59:56. OK ...

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